Resumark Blog

» Blog Home
Search
Post Resume
Post Resume
Free Resume Search
Free Resume Search
Post Jobs for Free
Post Jobs for Free
Job 2.0 Network
Job 2.0 Network










Archive for May, 2010

May 31st, 2010 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Interviewing, Job Search

Fire the fingerWhether the economy is up or down, looking for a job can be a long, lonely, frustrating process. That’s why it’s important you take steps to make your job-hunting efforts as effective as you can.

While there are many strategies and tactics that job-hunters use to get back into the work force, one of the least recognized and most misunderstood is to treat job-hunting like selling, and handle a job interview as you would a sales call. While they may not be appropriate for every job interview, it’s worth learning these skills, because in certain situations they can prove extraordinarily effective. Here are the basic guidelines:

Develop Promising Leads

Salespeople understand that trying to sell their product or service to people at random is unlikely to be very successful. The more promising the lead, the more likely the sales efforts are to come to fruition. In the same way, looking for work among companies that don’t need your skills or wouldn’t meet your requirements is unlikely to land you a job. The more promising the companies where you interview, the more likely your efforts are to result in a job offer you’re willing to accept.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

May 28th, 2010 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Most Popular, Resume Writing

get-paid-for-resumeThe most common resume format that people use is chronological, a simple listing of your work history with the most recent position listed first. But this isn’t always the best format to convince an employer to bring you in for an interview.

For some, a functional resume is a better option. This format focuses on skills and achievements and allows candidates to show off their most impressive experiences. The downside? Since this isn’t a common format, some employers are confused by functional resumes or may be suspicious that you are trying to hide a spotty employment record. 

So how do you know if it’s right for you? A chronological format works best if you have a stable, clear career progression through only one or two fields. A functional resume might be a good choice for you if you are…
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

May 27th, 2010 by Linda White   Posted in Most Popular, Unemployment

Laid Off From WorkGetting laid off is never fun. But some people are so wrapped up in their work identity that they see it as a personal attack. This is almost never the case. Most of the time, it is simply a business decision. Many people have been at the same job for years, and have made themselves quite at home. While this may work out well, in the event of a layoff, this will leave you with less personal resources, especially if you depended on your workplace for things like email and professional development. The following are some ideas for what you can do to claim back your identity and get back on your feet.

1. Make sure you have good working email and social network profiles. Don’t laugh; many people who have been working at a company since the advent of email use their work email for everything. If you’ve only been using your work email, set up a Gmail account on Google or a Yahoo or Hotmail account. It’s free and you’ll need it. If you don’t have a profile on LinkedIn, get one. If you do have one on that or any other professional site, make sure you update it. Don’t be afraid to state clearly that you are ‘in transition’ and state what you are looking for.


Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

May 26th, 2010 by Kate Seidametova   Posted in Employee Rights, In the Workplace

babyyoung businessman with pacifierWith college graduates anxiously searching for jobs, employers are finding that “helicopter” parents are becoming increasingly involved in their children’s job search.  Now, more than ever, employers and recruiters are seeing parents attending job fairs, making job interview appointments, and even showing up for job interviews accompanying their children!  Some employers are responding to this trend by training their hiring managers to handling helicopter parents, who constantly hover over their children’s lives.

What’s even more troubling is that this generation is not embarrassed by it.  In fact, many young employees are actually asking for their parents’ involvement. The consensus among hiring managers is that helicopter parents create a negative view and such involvement backfires; it hurts their children’s chances of getting a job.   Employers certainly don’t want to have to deal with parents and they want to hire mature, independent adults that can perform on their own, be their own advocates, and take personal responsibility.    Employers are thinking, “Can this individual perform duties expected of them? Are they going to call their parents every time they run into a problem? Who are we hiring? Are we hiring the candidate or their mommy and daddy?”
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

May 25th, 2010 by Guest Author   Posted in Salary & Finances, Unemployment

Get paid for your resume!For most people, being laid off means a major drop in income, even with unemployment payments and severance pay. It will probably take more than passing up lattes and renting fewer videos to make ends meet. Here are a few suggestions for saving hundreds of dollars each month:

1. Look at Your Car Insurance

As the commercials say, “Are you paying too much for car insurance?” If you have an older car that is paid off, it may not make sense to buy collision insurance. If the Blue Book value of your car is low compared to your insurance premiums you are probably paying more for collision insurance than you will get back if the car is totaled.

If your car is fairly new, you may want to increase your deductible to lower your insurance costs. After all, you are probably driving a lot less while you are out of work.

2. Talk to your credit card company

Many credit card companies have special payment plans for those who are unemployed. For example, Capital One will waive late fees and allow you to pay only the interest on your balance for three months.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

« Older Entries
« Previous
1
2
3
4
5