Resumark Blog

» Blog Home
Search
Post Resume
Post Resume
Free Resume Search
Free Resume Search
Post Jobs for Free
Post Jobs for Free
Job 2.0 Network
Job 2.0 Network










Archive for June, 2010

June 30th, 2010 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Job Search, Most Popular

networking-online-linkedinA good reference letter is particularly useful for recent college grads with no practical experience and those returning to the job market, but it can be a valuable tool for any job hunter. Here are six steps to make getting a letter easy!

Step 1: Start Early

Don’t wait until the last minute. It’s good practice to ask for a letter of recommendation when leaving a job or upon leaving college. This way, their experience with you is fresh in their memory, and you won’t have to track them down later. If you haven’t done this, no need to fret! Just give plenty of lead time. Hopefully a month, but at least a few weeks notice if possible.

Step 2: Decide Who to Ask

Getting a letter of reference from the company’s CEO sounds impressive, but if he or she doesn’t know you or your skill set well, it may not be the best idea. Ideally, you want to ask someone who is able to share specific examples and anecdotes, which will be more powerful than a generic recommendation. Start by making a list of people who have worked closely with you and know your experience and skill set.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

June 29th, 2010 by Sergey Novoselov   Posted in Salary & Finances

risky investmentRetirement plan providers make money even if you don’t. After the market crash in 2008 the value of our 401(k) plans sank dramatically. Regardless of a plan performance, most providers still get a cut of the expense ratio on the funds. After cost deduction for bookkeeping, administration and marketing, there can be money left, which, in most cases, stay with the plan providers and sometimes is used to market their investments to other companies rather than going back to investors.

You may not know where all your money is going. It’s often difficult for an investor to know the exact breakdown of fees for their 401(k) plan. Even if you know the breakdown, it can be hard to figure out what portion of it is an excess revenue. It may soon change: as lawmakers are closing the loopholes, the plan costs become more transparent, which usually lower fees.

You should not be paying the same fees for your 401(k) plan as if you bought it on your own, but you might be. Mutual funds are sold in different share classes depending on different factors. E.g. index funds are typically the cheapest option since they’re not actively managed, while small plans with fewer investors are usually more expensive.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

June 28th, 2010 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Most Popular, Resume Writing

junk-mail-resume-cover-letterThere is currently a big controversy raging about whether or not to include a cover letter when you send in your application for a job. Some recruiters and HR people claim they never look at cover letters. Others say they use a cover letter’s content and overall professionalism to decide which resumes will rise toward the top of the pile.

Since there is no hard and fast rule, it’s up to you to decide how best to stay in the running for a job: with a cover letter that may not be wanted, or without a cover letter that may be what the recruiter or HR person is looking for. Of course, when a cover letter is requested, you have no choice.

When you choose to send a cover letter, you should include it in the body of your email message. You could theoretically attach it to your email as a separate file, or integrate your cover letter material into the first part of your resume. However, most recruiters and HR people say it’s confusing to add a cover letter to your resume and it’s likely to be ignored if a cover letter arrives in a separate file by itself.

However you send it, there are several ways to craft an effective cover letter.

First, start with just a brief statement that you’re fully qualified for the job. Close the letter by expressing your interest in pursuing this job opportunity. As a final step, be sure to polish the cover letter until it’s short, sweet, and direct. In between, you can put three types of cover letter “meat”:
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

June 25th, 2010 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Job Search, Most Popular

Resumark.com: The Importance of Focusing Your Job Search By some accounts, only one out of every six or seven jobs is actually advertised to the public, and unfortunately insiders have a head start toward slipping into a great many of even those few opportunities that do reach public attention. If such accounts are even half true, there’s no harm and considerable potential benefit for job seekers who find other ways to connect with desirable employers.

One of the most promising strategies for making these kinds of connections is to search out the companies you’d like to work for and find a way to present yourself to managers who may be in a position to hire you — even without seeing a job advertised to the public.

If you decide to go this way, here’s how to proceed:


Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

June 24th, 2010 by Guest Author   Posted in Unemployment

jobs-search-overloadAt the start of my job hunt I didn’t take advantage of the services at my local office of the State Employment Service.  I assumed their services were geared only to entry level or blue-collar workers.  But after several less than stellar interviews, I called the office of Job and Family Services in my county to see if they offered any coaching or classes on interview skills.  I took a class on general interviewing tips, then the Interview Practicum.  The class covered the usual topics with some interesting information on high-pressure interview situations.  The practicum was just what I was looking for.  Since I was the only person to show up, I had a one on one coaching session on how to answer tough interview questions.  A mock interview was videotaped so we could play it back and discuss each answer.  The instructor had real world business and management experience, and had some great insights on ways to improve my interview performance.


Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

« Older Entries
« Previous
1
2
3
4
5