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Archive for March, 2011

March 25th, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in In the Workplace

Tips for Eating Better at WorkWe all know how tough it is to eat healthy while at the office. You’ve got a limited time for lunch, and hitting up the nearby food truck is so easy. Or maybe your coworkers always head out to lunch and you don’t want to be the one who doesn’t go. Or you’re lucky enough to work at a place where they provide food and snacks… which you graze on constantly throughout the day. Probably, at some point, you’ve experienced all of the above. Sometimes it feels like the workplace was designed to make you have unhealthy eating habits. No fear! There are ways to break out of this funk with a little effort on your part.

Brown bag it.

This one should be a no-brainer. Food from the grocery store – or even better, the farmer’s market – is just plain better for you than having lunch out at most restaurants. You choose the ingredients, so you can make sure you have a healthy breakfast and lunch that you actually enjoy. Why don’t more people do this? Because it takes time! Who wants to have to get up and make food every day before work? The solution, however, is simple. Instead of making your meals each day, one at a time, set aside a half hour on the Sunday night and prepare meals for the whole week. This way, you just have to grab it and go on workdays! Then, if your co-workers still go out to lunch and invite you along, you can eat before they go and just keep them company, or if you feel comfortable, bring your bag lunch with you. Most places won’t give you trouble as long as the rest of your party is ordering there.
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March 23rd, 2011 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Interviewing

Ace Every Type Of InterviewIf you think deeply enough about interviewing, you’ll realize that it’s mostly a relationship — although often a short-lived one — in which the other side calls the tune, and expects you to dance to it.

But the specifics of the tune depend to a great extent on the kind of interview you’re involved with, and that largely depends on the personality of the interviewer. That’s why candidates with good people skills often score much higher in their interviews than people who may be more qualified, but who don’t relate so well to strangers.

Fortunately, the vast majority of interviewers fit into one of several types. If you pay attention during the first few minutes of an interview, you can usually categorize your interviewer, and on that basis shift into the proper relationship mode to do very well in the type of interview that’s likely to follow.

Here’s a rundown of the basic types of interviewers and interviews you’re likely to encounter:
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March 21st, 2011 by Linda White   Posted in Unemployment

News for the Long-term Unemployed: Now, this is not to suggest that you are lazy. But if you’ve been unemployed for a long time – long-term joblessness is now classified as nine months or longer – you may find that your motivation and your opportunities are waning. You may feel discouraged, hopeless and even depressed. You are not imagining it, and you are not alone.

A recent study by the Brookings Institution had several key findings:
  • Long-term unemployed spend more time sleeping – particularly sleeping late in the morning.
  • Long-term unemployed spend less time looking for work the longer they are unemployed – up to a half hour less over a 12 week period.
  • Long-term unemployed express more unhappiness with their lives.
  • The expiration of unemployment benefits has little or not effect on how hard a person looks for a job or their likelihood of finding one.
Add to this recent allegations of discrimination against the unemployed – ads by giants such as Sony Ericsson saying that only employed applicants will be considered. With 6.2 million people out of work and around 4.6 candidates for each job opening, that leaves an awful lot of people out in the cold. Sometimes literally. Fed Chair Ben Bernanke didn’t help matters much by saying on a “60 Minutes” interview that long-term workers’ skills erode. It’s true, but with that kind of pronouncement from the upper level, suddenly it has more credibility.
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March 16th, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, In the Workplace

Telecommuting: Pros and ConsWorking from home can seem like an ideal situation. Who doesn’t dream of simply rolling out of bed and walking over to their computer to start the day? But if this is an option you might approach your employer about, you should make sure that it’s the right decision for you. Sure, spending the day in your pajamas is just one of the many benefits of telecommuting, but there are many downsides too. Consider them all before making your decision.

Pros

You’ll save money. Since you won’t be driving to work every day, you won’t spend nearly as much money on gas. You also don’t need to invest in as many work clothes, and it’s easier for you to keep food costs under control since it’s more convenient to eat at home.

You can make your own schedule. Forget 9 to 5, there’s no one there to notice if you start work late or end early, as long as you meet your deadlines and answer emails promptly. That means more flexibility for your personal life, organizing work around child care, taking time off during the day for family engagements, and running errands.
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March 15th, 2011 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice, In the Workplace

Ethical Leadership - It's The Right Thing To DoIt’s a gas being a leader. People hang on your words, look to you for decisions, and follow your ideas and your plans no matter which way you want to go. That’s why it’s important you maintain a strong sense of what’s right and wrong behavior for your team.

Ethical leadership is rarely a central part of leadership training, but it probably should be. Otherwise, the devastation and pain caused by unethical leadership — driven by anything from fraud to greed to egotism — already incalculable, will continue to grow.

If you are a leader, or hope to become one, your awareness of the elements of ethical leadership will help you avoid mistakes that you and your team, and most likely others, will have to pay for later. Here are some suggestions:
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