Resumark Blog

» Blog Home
Search
Post Resume
Post Resume
Free Resume Search
Free Resume Search
Post Jobs for Free
Post Jobs for Free
Job 2.0 Network
Job 2.0 Network










Archive for June, 2011

June 30th, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, In the Workplace

istock_000001375118xsmallLet’s just put it out there: no matter what the circumstances - resigning because you finally got that dream job or let go due to downsizing - these things are weird. You’re trying to sum up what could be years of your life at a company in a short piece of text. It doesn’t always come easy. It is, however, natural for us to want to send one, so if you’re going to do it, there are some general rules and guidelines you should try to follow.

Don’t burn bridges.

This should be painfully obvious, but sometimes when we feel like we’ve escaped from a place we didn’t much like, there’s an urge to let loose and basically say, “see ya, suckers!” Resist this urge. The bridge you burn today is the very one you’ll be wishing you could use tomorrow. Plus, if you’re sending out a company-wide email, there’s a great likelihood you’ll be reaching people who don’t really know you that well. Is a rant really the first impression you want them to have?
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

June 29th, 2011 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice, In the Workplace

istock_000004786200xsmallThe title of this article is controversial, because many people will react to it by saying something like: “Good leaders should help their team avoid conflict, not purposely lead them through it.”

That’s certainly a point of view, but it’s a limited, idealistic one. In theory, it might be possible to guide a team so powerfully, so thoughtfully, and so adroitly that team members never experience conflict. But total freedom from conflict tends to be the exception, rather than the rule.

Last time, we covered how leaders can begin preparing a team to handle conflicts. When a conflict actually arises, however, it’s time to take more direct action:

Recognize The Conflict and Study Its Main Elements

Properly prepared for conflict, your team should never try to skirt around one. That simply leaves the problem(s) alive, but untreated and unopposed, so they can easily fester and grow worse.

Instead, your team members will do better to look into the conflict as directly as possible, identifying and understanding the various perspectives, ideas, values, goals, perceptions, and agendas that are contributing to the conflict. Because important conflicts generate strong emotions, it’s important for the team to tread gently, but steadily, toward the root(s) of the conflict.

Whatever conflict-resolution process the team follows, it’s important to:

Nail down positions – Everyone involved in the conflict will have their own idea of how to resolve it. By getting people to sign off on their positions with regard to the conflict, you not only create the potential for easier resolution of minor differences, you make it more difficult for people to hide their true positions by shifting the frame, or by spouting convenient “window-dressing” ideas and arguments in which they aren’t fully invested. For example, Sally doesn’t like Joe. But she doesn’t say that. Instead, today she takes issue with the quality of his work. Tomorrow she finds fault with the way he prioritizes his responsibilities. Raising his standards or changing his priorities will never resolve Joe’s conflict with Sally. The only chance for resolution of this conflict is to deal directly with Sally’s dislike of Joe.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

June 28th, 2011 by Linda White   Posted in Career Advice, Networking

istock_000016275769xsmall1Once you start adding people to your LinkedIn account, the nice algorithm will tell you how many connections your connections have. It can be mind-boggling.

The main benefit and ostensibly the reason for the LinkedIn site is networking. I have linked up with people that I have worked with in the past, and I have linked up to people that I have met at trade shows and through other professional means. It is a good use for all of those business cards you collect at an event. If you had a good conversation with someone, look them up and include a note saying where you met. You never know when they might need your help or you might need theirs.

The idea is that, using a feature on the site, you can ask one of your connections for an Introduction to one of their connections, if it’s someone you want to meet or who might be in a position to help you. I have used this feature very sparingly, as it seems to be too artificial, unless the person connecting you really knows you and that other person very well. I have found that a better way to make connections to people I don’t know is to join groups.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

June 24th, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, In the Workplace

Business team showing thumbs upEveryone says that the job market is getting better - slowly - but it’s still an incredibly tough market out there, and you want to do whatever you can to show the boss that you’re the right person for the job. You’ll work harder, faster, smarter - whatever it takes. Which is why we’re offering you some tips on improving productivity. Start using a few of these, and you won’t be worried about keeping your job - you’ll be worried about how much to ask for in your promotion!

1. Nap.

Weren’t expecting that one, were you? But multiple studies have shown that taking a short 20 minute nap after lunch can improve your creativity, mood, and focus - your productivity - by as much at 34%!

2. Delegate.

That’s right, give your work to someone else - the parts that don’t absolutely have to be done by you, that is. It may seem like a lazy move, but not if you’re doing it for genuine reasons. Take the time you save delegating your smaller, less significant tasks and use it to take on a bigger job you haven’t had time for. Or polish up a presentation that’s gotten the short shrift because of all the little daily tasks you’ve had to do. Even better, delegation can show your boss that you’re a good leader and know how to use other people as resources. Often when one person is swamped, others don’t have enough to do. So lighten your load and show that you’re paying attention to the resources around you.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

June 23rd, 2011 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice, In the Workplace, Resumark News

istock_000009432948xsmallThe title of this article is controversial, because many people will react to it by saying something like: “Good leaders should help their team avoid conflict, not purposely lead them through it.”

That’s certainly a point of view, but it’s a limited, idealistic one. In theory, it might be possible to guide a team so powerfully, so thoughtfully, and so adroitly that team members never experience conflict. But total freedom from conflict tends to be the exception, rather than the rule.

When you look around at how people actually behave, you’ll see that conflict with others is a routine occurrence. Fortunately, that’s not a bad thing.

In fact, conflict is sometimes a positive aspect of living and working in today’s world, because it’s evidence that diverse ideas, backgrounds, values, and points of view are actively in play. One of the best ways to avoid conflict is through homogeneity, which is also a great way to:
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

« Older Entries
« Previous
1
2
3