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Archive for August, 2011

August 31st, 2011 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice, Networking

istock_000016167039xsmallMost advice on “getting ahead” in the world of business assumes that male-oriented behaviors will win the day, and therefore encourages both men and women to behave more like males.

But in most situations, people who can draw on success-oriented behavior from both genders are far more likely to get what they want. And employers, hiring managers, supervisors, and coworkers tend to appreciate and prefer to work with such men and women.

Last time, we discussed the importance of tuning your conversational behavior and your personal movements to help you obtain the results you want. This time, let’s discuss two more success-oriented techniques that everyone should master:
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August 30th, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, In the Workplace

istock_000011222526xsmallMaybe a good friend or family member just passed away. Or you’re going through a divorce or bad breakup. Or you’re recovering after a major injury or sickness. Or you’ve moved across the world or country. Whatever it is, dealing with a major change to your life can be disruptive and make it extremely difficult to focus.

Most employers allow for some kind of personal time to allow you to get your life back on track, but eventually you’re going to have to return to the office. Dealing with the nuts and bolts of your workplace is probably going to be the last thing on your mind, but there are things you can do to help cope and keep your mind where it needs to be.

Keep in touch. Whether it’s a big move or a loss in your life of some kind or another, making sure that you talk regularly with your family and close friends can help you deal with the emotions you’re feeling in a healthy way while providing a sense of normalcy that lets you focus on the day-to-day things you need to.
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August 24th, 2011 by Linda White   Posted in Career Advice

Happy energetic business man enjoying his successYour career may feel a little stagnated lately. If you are out of work, it’s hard to find something in your field that pays what you were making. If you are working, you may feel stunted by either being overworked (making up for all those folks who were laid off) or the fact that you cannot readily go find something new (and likely your employer knows it).

Maybe you are bored with what you are doing, or with what you were doing. Not sure what to look for next. Maybe you want to do something that really gives you the fire in the belly. Face it, few people find careers that they really feel passionate about. But some do. We’ve all heard of people who say, “I’ve never worked a day in my life.” How can you be one of these lucky ones?

Easy. Do what you love.

How easy is that? It’s actually not as hard as you might think. You may have to revisit your lifestyle, your perception of success or the expectations of those around you. But it can be done. Don’t be afraid of change. Simply identify your passion and find work that lets you become involved in it.
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August 23rd, 2011 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice, In the Workplace

istock_000006288600xsmallRegardless of where you fit in today’s organizational structures, you can have a bigger impact and produce more desirable results if you take steps to build more trust in the people around you.

There are several reasons for this, and chief among them is that higher levels of trust lead to higher levels of energy, enthusiasm, and effort.

In addition, people who trust you more not only take direction from you better, they feel safe enough to contribute more information and ideas to the decision-making process, and they tend to be more heavily invested in achieving desired outcomes.

Trust is also a valuable commodity because these days it is in relatively short supply. Employers and their employees tend to lack trust in each other. Sales organizations and their customers frequently have suspicions about the other’s motivations. Many team members and team leaders can think back on times when they were treated badly, and may feel a little squeamish about giving their full trust to the other.

In these and other environments, the person who asks for trust and makes a point of behaving in ways that deserve trust stands out from the rest in very positive ways.
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August 22nd, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, Job Search

istock_000004555269xsmallYour company is downsizing. Luckily, they’ve told you that your job is safe - if you’re willing to relocate. Or you’ve been out of work and finally got another job offer… on the other side of the country.

With times as tough as they are, you might be considering taking the job. After all, who knows when your next offer will come or if it will even be as good as this one? But before you make any decision, take as much time as you can to consider your options, and what relocating will really mean.

Who pays? With selling and buying a home, moving furniture and other belongings, and possibly even renting a temporary apartments while you house-hunt, relocating can cost anywhere from $25,000 to $75,000 for the average family. Many companies offer relocation packages for new employees that will cover most, if not all, of this, but it’s not guaranteed. You might have to negotiate to have this cost taken into consideration. If your new company still won’t foot the bill, you’ll have to cover everything yourself. The only good news here is that moving expenses can be deducted from your income taxes if you meet certain requirements.
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