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Archive for October, 2011

October 27th, 2011 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice

The Power of Humility Other than spiritual leaders, very few people try to teach the power of humility. Yet there are a number of specific benefits the flow from the daily practice of humility, including:
  • an improvement in relationships,
  • a reduction in anxiety,
  • an escalation of openness, and
  • an expansion of self-confidence.
Humility is usually defined as a form of modesty, or a belief that you and others are equal, or an absence of pretense. Yet some people worry that showing any humility is like admitting to low self-esteem or what’s even worse: timidity.

Nothing could be farther from the truth.
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October 26th, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, Job Search

Tips for Effective Business CardsBusiness cards are a form of traditional marketing that’s not likely to go away anytime soon. Even with the advent of electronic business cards, it’s still usually more convenient to get contact information the old-fashioned way. But technology has made it easier for anyone to have a business card. There are many sites with templates and graphics that allow you to design your own, and you can even buy special paper to print it out right at the office. These can be great options for small businesses that are just starting out and don’t have enough money to pay for professional designing and printing, but whether you’re making it yourself or hiring someone else to handle it, there are a few things you should think about.

Include your contact information. It may seem obvious, but you’d be surprised by how many people forget one of the four most important contact methods: phone number, email address, website, and mailing address. If you don’t have a business mailing address or don’t feel comfortable sharing it, consider at least listing your city and state so people have a reference for where you’re located.

List your social networks. One of the best ways to keep in touch with potential clients is by getting them to sign up for your Twitter feed, Facebook page, or LinkedIn profile. If you provide regular updates on these sites, be sure to include them.
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October 25th, 2011 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in In the Workplace

Keeping Morale High

It’s a rough world, out there, and at one time or another most people are going to feel less than optimistic about things. Sometimes it’s caused by a short-term situation, other times by long-term prospects.

Sometimes its the people you’re stuck with who bring you down; other times it’s a feeling your own resources and abilities are falling short.

Factors that contribute to high or low morale include feelings of security, self-worth, social or community or market value, pride, satisfying relationships, and optimism that these will continue at the same or better levels in the future.

The issue of morale is both complex and important. When it’s high, Almost by definition, people chalk up higher productivity and engagement in everyday tasks. They’re less likely to leave their current situation, and they tend to feel happy much of the time. Teams with high morale are desirable places to be, and can more easily recruit the people they want. When morale falters, however, the decline can quickly lead to cascades of other difficulties and problems.

When people begin to feel the outlook is negative, for example, whether individually or as a team, they enter a kind of vicious circle in which their dispirited attitude reduces the quality and quantity of their results, which helps them to feel even less spirited, causing further problems.

Because morale is so important, successful people tend to monitor their own level, and that of their associates, and do what they can to keep morale on the high side of the dial.
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October 21st, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, In the Workplace

Managing Personality ConflictsWe all butt heads with our co-workers from time to time, and some disagreement is even a good thing when it is handled appropriately. It can challenge your employees to be more creative, result in new solutions to problems, and help people to learn from one another. But ongoing conflict that creates bitterness, resentment, or discomfort is never good. It can effect performance, hurt morale, and negatively impact communication. So if you notice that two employees aren’t getting along, you shouldn’t ignore the problem. It’s likely to get worse over time.

Set ground rules. Make it clear that certain behaviors are just not acceptable in the office. Sometimes people get so close to their co-workers that they forget they are in a professional environment. A few behaviors you should ban include yelling, slamming doors, threatening, bullying, belittling, name-calling, cursing, aggressive behavior, and of course any forms of violence. By making it clear that these types of behaviors are not condoned, you will also make it more comfortable for employees to come forward if they are experiencing an issue.

Address each individual privately. Find out what’s at the root of the problem and see if that can be addressed. Don’t go into these meetings thinking that you know who’s to blame or ready to dole out punishment. Instead really listen to the concerns of both employees and assess the situation as impartially as possible.
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October 19th, 2011 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice, On the Radar

Following in Steve Jobs Footsteps. Young Steve Jobs The world of technology and business — hey, perhaps the entire world — lost a giant on October 5th, 2011, when Steve Jobs died suddenly from cancer. Jobs, perhaps best known for his second stint with Apple Computers starting in 1996, actually chalked up several different accomplishments, any one of which would have been enough to mark him as a visionary and remarkable leader.

- In the 1970’s, he co-founded Apple Computers and helped start the mass movement of those primitive information-processing devices out of the hobbyists’ garages and onto the desks of business executives.

- Years later, Jobs founded NeXT Computer and pioneered the object-oriented programming paradigm which has had a massive, if relatively obscure, influence on nearly all subsequent personal computer development.

- During the same period, he purchased Pixar from Lucasfilm, relocated it from England to California, and steered the fledgling company toward a successful and long-term partnership with Disney, kicked off by the creation of the first fully-computer-animated feature film: Toy Story.

- Only then did Jobs return to Apple and drive the company in what was then a totally new direction: introducing a series of blockbuster and game-changing products, including the iMac, iPod, and iPhone, not to mention the highly innovative iTunes Store. Less well known is Jobs’ innovative effort to take back the company’s old products for environmentally-friendly recycling and disposal.
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