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Archive for November, 2011

November 30th, 2011 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in In the Workplace

Someone Hates MeIt’s not a pleasant experience, but many of us are operating in workplace situations where we have enemies. Whether it’s a subordinate, a peer, or a superior, feeling enmity beaming at you from someone else is always difficult, often debilitating.

And if the person who doesn’t like you has influence over you and your job, the situation can get very ugly very fast.

Whether or not you feel yourself being disliked or hated right now, chances are pretty good that you’ll experience this emotional pressure sometime during your working life. When you do, there are really only two basic strategies to pursue:

Improve the Situation

No one likes to be hated. So when you feel this negative emotion coming your way, it’s natural to want to improve the situation.

Your first step should always be to figure out who is doing the hating, and why. If the person who hates you is not openly expressing their feelings, use your remaining friendships and connections to zero in on the culprit. Most people don’t like to get involved in these kinds of interpersonal problems, so only your best friends may be willing to name names. Even if they are not, you can usually get hints about the source of the negativity by pretending to know more than you do.
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November 29th, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Resumark News

Quick Tips to Personalize Your Cover LetterEvery single cover letter should be personalized. If you’ve been out in the world looking for a job for any length of time, you know this. You’ve been told over and over. And it makes sense - if you’re an employer, are you going to give precedence to the cover letter that says something unique and interesting and shows that the jobseeker took their time and cares about getting a job at your company… or the one that reads like a form letter?

Here’s the problem, though: really and truly making each letter personal by rewriting it from the ground up each time to fit the needs of every single job you apply for - that just isn’t feasible for most of us. Nor is it practical. You should be spending your time looking for more jobs rather than agonizing over perfecting a cover letter that - let’s face it - most likely isn’t going to get you hired.

So what’s the answer, then? Too generic and you get ignored. Too specific and personal and you’re likely wasting time. What you need is a middle ground. A way to make each letter feel personal without actually needing to start from scratch each time. Check out the tips below and you’ll be ready to do just that - employers will be beating down your door in no time!

Name the person you’re emailing. I know it’s difficult - and sometimes impossible these days with internet postings that can even withhold the name of the company - but do whatever you can to get the name of the person to whom the email is going. Call the company. Go to their website. When all else fails, don’t do the generic “To Whom It May Concern,” Instead, address your application to the “Hiring Manager”, “College Recruiter”, or “Selection Committee.”
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November 28th, 2011 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Resumark News

Increase Your Workplace Visibility - Part 2In a perfect world, everyone would recognize and appreciate your capabilities before you ever had to ask. In the modern workplace, asking is rarely enough. In fact, it’s easy to get lost amid the complexity of most tasks and the cooperation required within most teams.

Last time, we covered ideas for better positioning and extended networking to win yourself appropriate visibility. This time, let’s cover a few more ideas to make sure your work is properly noticed:

Log What You Do

Don’t trust your memory to keep track of everything you work on, every goal you accomplish. It’s too easy to forget some of the work, or some of the people. Instead, keep a written and dated log or diary of your projects, the work you do, the people with whom you interact, and the results you achieve.

Use this log to prompt your supervisor’s memory prior to and during your performance and compensation reviews. Also, review it as necessary so when management asks if you know anything about X,  or  Y, o r Z, you’re primed to give chapter and verse on all you’ve accomplished in those areas, and the extent of your expertise.

Don’t forget to include in your log all the praise, compliments, and positive work reviews you earn from customers, clients, and colleagues.

All this information will also be useful in establishing your value within the organization.

Learn to Like the Spotlight

It’s not psychologically healthy to be the kind of person who is happy only when he or she is receiving attention, adulation, or acclaim. But it’s neither smart or healthy to shy away from kudos you have honestly earned.
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November 23rd, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in In the Workplace

Stock PhotoThanksgiving brings to mind many things - the crisp, cool air of autumn; leaves changing color or crunching under your feet; football; relaxing with your loved ones; and, of course, the million different foods you get to eat.

What it probably doesn’t make you think about is sitting in your cubicle at the office with all of your coworkers, the florescent lights giving off their sickly glow as the air conditioner works tirelessly to convince you that the temperature never changes.

Unfortunately, if you’re going to be stuck at work this Thanksgiving, those are the things you’re going to be experiencing. But there are ways for you to bring the holiday to your workspace - even if you’re not working on the big day itself, but just want to get into the spirit.

Obviously, before you do anything you should check with your supervisor or HR rep, but most workplaces welcome it when someone wants to brighten up the office around a holiday.

Deck the halls. Yes, it’s a term most often associated with Christmas, but all it really means is to decorate an area. So get to it. Most workplaces have some kind of budget for party or event planning, so see if someone can get a few things to spruce up the place like those tiny pumpkins they sell at grocery stores, or some cheap decorations like paper turkeys or pilgrims. If your workplace doesn’t have a person designated to do this, offer your services. Or let it be known that people can bring in their own decorations — even better, make it a contest!
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November 22nd, 2011 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice, In the Workplace, On the Radar

The Power of GivingIn a real sense, there are only two kinds of people in the world: those who readily give to others, and those who don’t. It’s amazing that in this day and age anyone would still be reluctant to give, because studies regularly show that people who freely and openly give to others tend to be happier, more energetic, sharper, more in touch with people and events around them, and enjoy more friendships than those who are stingier with their time, resources, and efforts.

In the world of work, particularly, the strategy of giving has been shown to provide significant benefits. Givers tend to be more productive than takers. They feel more engaged with their work environments, and win more promotions, too. Giving builds trust, earns respect, and encourages those to whom you give to help you, in return.

What’s most important, though, is that a mentality of giving often replicates itself. When one person consistently gives, others notice, and themselves become more likely to give. The result is that one “good apple” can preserve and improve a whole team, organization, or network.

Most of us think of giving as an act of charity: donating some cash, or giving away a possession to someone else who can use it. But the best kinds of interpersonal giving don’t really cost you anything, except some time and attention. In a strange way, the more you give, the more you become able to give.

Ways to Give

Here are some simple, but effective, ways to give to others that happily tend to improve your own life and work:

Give Your Attention — Giving your time when others want to speak is the most basic form of giving, and in some ways the most important. Your simple act of paying attention to other people helps them work out their own ideas and feelings, test out the validity of their choices and conclusions, feel more confident, and — perhaps most important — bond with you.
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