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Archive for February, 2012

February 28th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice

Opportunities for New LeadershipWhether you slide into a leadership position with a new company, or get newly promoted to leadership within your present organization, fitting yourself into a new-to-you leadership role automatically offers some wonderful opportunities (that are less-readily available to old-timers) to set a faster pace toward success.

Here are some suggestions on how to take advantage of opportunities that come with a new leadership post:

Lead For The Long Term

There’s always a strong incentive to make things pleasant right now and let the future take care of itself. The problem is, of course, that today’s small glitch can become an insurmountable problem in the future. That’s why taking a new leadership position presents a great opportunity to set a long-term strategy, to identify both problems and opportunities out there on the horizon, and to initiate actions and programs to help the future turn out closer to the way you’d like.

Obviously, you need to balance concern for the future with concern for the present, but your new leadership position allows you a short-term window of opportunity to:

Establish monitoring mechanisms so events won’t take you by surprise.

Find and empower people who nicely match or complement your balance of present/future concerns.

Teach those around you in the organization to appreciate and support your balance of present/future concerns.

Set the Tone for Teamwork and Credit

As a leader, you’re automatically going to get the credit for your team’s successes and the blame for its shortcomings. But effective leaders have learned that eagerly sharing the credit and doggedly shielding the team from excessive blame nearly always leads to higher levels of effectiveness and success. Team attitudes about a leader’s loyalty and selfishness are notoriously difficult to change, so taking a new leadership position is the optimum time to set a new standard for how you’ll behave. For example, why not:

Establish a rewards program that acknowledges individual contributions to team successes
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Setting Rules for Social MediaWhen social media in the workplace is discussed on most media outlets, they tend to focus on the downside: employees who badmouth their bosses or company secrets getting leaked. This has led companies to ban the use of social networks outright, but this isn’t always the right decision.

For many companies, having employees tweeting and posting about the company can be a good thing. A really good thing. After all, it’s free marketing! Also, employees can use social networks to get inspired, do research, and learn more about their field.

Plus, a ban at the workplace doesn’t keep people from posting about the company from home, and many employees may be confused about what is or isn’t allowed. That’s why it’s important to have a social media policy as part of your employee handbook. But where do you start?

Encourage employees to get involved. It’s likely they are already, and you can harness the power of all their connections for the good of your company. Also, by presenting your social media policy in a positive light, you’re less likely to get backlash from employees. Explain that you are developing a policy to clear up any confusion for employees and encourage them to ask questions about any concerns they have.
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February 21st, 2012 by Danielle Kogan   Posted in Job News, On the Radar

Does your career hit the mark?
Via: CollegeOnline.org
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February 20th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice

How to Hang On to Your Current Job Part 2With the outlook for employment growth so bleak, many forward-looking employees - particularly some of the older ones - are realizing that the best way to avoid a long and unsettling period of job-hunting is to take some immediate steps to hang on to your current position.

Last time, we covered the idea of providing innovations that make you more valuable, and staying up-to-date within your field. Here are some additional techniques for making sure the decision-makers above you recognize your unique and irreplaceable contributions to the organization’s success:

Identify and emphasize the connections between your work and your organization’s success.

For example, if you’re in sales then your contribution is to bring in business. If you’re in manufacturing, your contribution is to produce items for sale. In other positions, the connections may be less obvious. Whatever you do, take the time and effort to understand in detail how your work fits into the organization’s overall activity and - this is important - how it impacts whatever metrics your supervisor and other managers value the most.

The more vividly you can make clear the connection between what you do and your organization’s success, the more likely you are to be appreciated and honored for your daily contributions.

Stretch out your time horizon. Look around within your organization for changes that will take a relatively long time to complete - moving to a new location, reconfiguring the flow of work, introducing a new product or service, and the like. Think about changes currently underway, of course, but also look farther out for changes likely to happen in the future. Then take steps to involve yourself in these changes.
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February 17th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice

ugly funny manager or business man isolatedWith the outlook for employment growth so bleak, many forward-looking employees - particularly some of the older ones - are realizing the best way to avoid a long and unsettling period of job-hunting is to take some immediate steps to hang on to your current position.

In normal times, just doing your job well is usually enough to ensure a continuing stream of paychecks. But when the economy is under pressure and employers are so comfortable with the notion of “downsizing,” satisfactory job performance is only the first step toward income security. It’s also important that you build a strong case for your employer to keep you on the job.

To do this, you must take actions intended to help your supervisors perceive your full value to the organization. The operative words here are both “perceive” and “value.” In today’s environment, you can easily be replaced by someone else who is also willing to pull their weight. You must make sure the decision-makers above you recognize your unique and irreplaceable contributions to the organization’s success.

There are many ways to do this. They include:

Offer innovations that increase your value. Think back over your career and itemize the most valuable skills and knowledge you have accumulated. Then look for new ways your organization can benefit from these skills and knowledge.
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