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Archive for April, 2012

April 24th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Job Search, Networking

Can Blogging Help Your Job Search?You’ve likely heard about companies firing their employers for complaining about their jobs (or sometimes even just mentioning them) in their personal blogs. What you don’t hear as much about are the success stories. People who attract the attention of employers through their blogging.

Why would blogging make employers think that you’re the person for them? Maintaining a blog requires a certain kind of skillset and can translate into a number of workplace environments.

You have to know how to market… Obviously great for marketing positions, but really in any industry where you might be creating a presentation about something for your bosses (or their bosses), this is a great skill to have.

…and network. The way to get more hits on your blog is that same way you get ahead in the business world: network with the right people who are able and willing to lend a helping hand in exchange for you doing the same.

You have to be able to build and maintain relationships. In other words - people skills. Sure, you’re dealing with your readers virtually, but a lot of the same manners and protocols apply that do in the work place. Good people skills are always a sought-after skill.

You have to be able to clearly communicate. This applies to, oh, just about every job anywhere. Unless you’re working completely alone, you’ll need to talk to coworkers, delegate effectively to people below you, and explain to your superiors why you did or didn’t do what they asked of you. People who communicate well tend to do well.
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April 20th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Job Search, Recruiting & Hiring, Resume Writing

Use Twitter for Job HuntingThe advice is well known: as soon as you’re back on the streets, looking for work, you:
  • Update your resume
  • Tweak your LinkedIn profile
  • Browse the job boards
  • Apply to every open position that makes sense
  • Tell family, friends and professional colleagues that you’re looking
But there’s more you can do: Although Twitter is best known for silly, superficial, in-the-moment communications among people who know each other personally, it’s increasingly coming into use as a networking medium among people who have never met.

With Twitter accumulating active, involved users at a breath-taking pace, there are starting to be ways to use this communications channel for job hunting - ways that didn’t exist just a short time ago.

These include:

1) Tweet your needs to your friends and followers. It’s smart to use Twitter to let everyone in your network know you’re back in the hunt for a good position. Not only may you reach people not included in LinkedIn, Facebook, and your other networks, people who tweet are often an active, plugged-in group. In many cases, your contacts on Twitter will quickly offer you strong leads, or at least useful contacts, you can pursue as you search for your next job.
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April 17th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Networking

5 Most Common Networking MistakesNetworking. Is there a more cringe-inducing word in the English language? Most people are not inherently good at it, and some even find the idea of it distasteful. Unfortunately, your personal connections are the best asset you have in getting a job and moving ahead, so networking - and networking well - is something that all of us have to work on.

That’s why it’s valuable to look at 5 of the most common mistakes people make when trying to network. Avoid these, and you’ll be well on your way to making a positive connection.

Make it all about you. Yes, the point of networking with someone is so that you can get them to help you in some way, but that doesn’t mean that you should ask for their help right away. Most people will find this rude, and even if they do help you, they might do it begrudgingly. At the very least, you want to forge some kind of personal connection before asking for what you want, but it’s even better if you can make yourself useful to them in some way.

Paper the town. When you ask someone for their help, or even just to get to know them, you want them to feel like it’s because they’re special - they are the only one who can help you because of their special knowledge and abilities. But that’s not going to be possible if you take a scattershot approach and put yourself out there to a bunch of people because you want to make sure that someone comes through for you. Do that and you’ll quickly become that annoying person that no one wants to help.
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April 9th, 2012 by Linda White   Posted in Career Advice, Unemployment

Handling the Ups and Downs of a Job SearchThe New Year’s gloss is off the year: the resolutions are broken (or mostly) and the time is zipping by. When you are job hunting, it’s hard to look at a blank slate and fill it with promising dreams. If you are feeling beat up by the job search and thinking that blank slate is a bad thing, read on.

Keeping yourself motivated during any job search can be difficult. But this is especially true during a very long, protracted job search in a bad economy. The ups and downs can be as difficult to handle as finding the jobs to apply for. You’re buoyed by each new call for an interview, apprehensive when called for second interviews, and crushed when the call comes that you were one of two finalists - and it didn’t go your way. If you feel as though you are marked with a big red L on your forehead, or you are frustrated by jumping through all the hoops only to be told no, you are not alone. What you need are a few coping strategies, and a little dose of reality.

Don’t bank on one opportunity

Even if it’s the job of your dreams - especially if it’s the job of your dreams - do not stop applying for other jobs. Keep your foot in the game and continue to be responsive and enthusiastic about other opportunities. We all know not to count our chickens before they’re hatched, but it’s so tempting when things seem to be lining up. Remember, you don’t have the job until an offer has been made, and sometimes, not even then.
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