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Archive for May, 2012

May 31st, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in In the Workplace, Job News

Things That Affect Your Productivity – Part 1: PsychologyMost people know that their environment can affect the way that they work, but often we don’t put a whole lot of thought into the different things that help or hurt us, and what we can do about them.

Researchers that study the way we work best as human beings have laid out three different types of environmental factors that impact our ability to get things done when we need to. These are psychological, territorial, and physical. In this post, I’m going to focus on the way our own psychology affects our productivity levels.

Psychology Equals Focus

That may be breaking it down a bit too simply, but in large part, it’s true. When we can focus or get “in the zone,” our productivity goes way up, and often even the quality of the work itself improves. People who are truly and intensely focused can even lose track of time because they’re so into what they’re doing.
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May 29th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice

Steps toward Setting and Reaching More Effective GoalsThis is probably not the first article you’ve read about setting goals. To set goals is a standard piece of advice, and there are lots of ideas floating around about which goals to set, how to set them, and how to reach them.

In this piece, I’m going to try to give you information you haven’t previously encountered about goals. For example:

Before You Ever Set A Goal, Find The Answers To These Questions

As Yoga Berra famously said, “If you don’t know where you’re going, you’ll wind up someplace else.” That’s why it’s important you set a favorable and desirable direction before you ever set a goal. Your direction depends on the answers to these important questions:

On your deathbed, what accomplishments would make you the happiest? The proudest?

What are the stepping stones to those accomplishments?

Give your primary strengths and weaknesses, can you realistically hope to complete your “death bed” accomplishments?
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May 24th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice

5 Time Management TipsThe old saying goes that there are only two sure things in this life: death and taxes. I believe that there is a third, however: wasting (or mismanaging) time. We all do this, to some degree or another, and oftentimes it creates unnecessary stress in our lives. But what you might not realize is that there may be a reason for your poor time management beyond, well, poor time management. So, in an effort to reduce stress and make us better, more productive people, here are 5 ways to manage your time better.

Take frequent breaks. Huh? How exactly will taking more breaks make you more productive? Because working incessantly on something can fry your brain and make you distracted even when you’re “working.” By building break time into your day, you can actually focus during the time you need to.

Say no when you need to. One of the big reasons many of us get stressed out and feel like we never have time to get everything done is because we don’t know how to say no - even when we’re already swamped. Sometimes it’s not only okay but better for you to say no because you’re stretched so thin that you might end up doing a subpar job anyway.
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May 22nd, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice

Components of Personal SuccessThe media are full of top executives, innovators, entrepreneurs, and other leading lights who have made their marks in a wide variety of ways. You can’t browse a news website without seeing another story about the remarkable things someone like this has accomplished.

Yet these stories rarely, if ever, reveal what sets these people apart and what allowed them to reach the topmost levels of the slippery pole of success.

To remedy that, here’s a quick checklist of some components of personal success. If you work on improving these factors, you’ll almost certainly find that slippery pole far easier to climb.

Skills for Thinking and Doing

There are exceptions, but by and large the most successful people tend to be very good at the basic skills of modern life. These include:
  • Reading well, and widely, and retaining much of what you read.
  • Writing clearly, persuasively, and with proper spelling.
  • Calculating numbers, using simple addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. It’s helpful -if you also “get” percentages and fraction.
  • Identifying the essential elements of a problem, and finding an extraordinary solution.
  • Digital tools, such as computers, the Internet, smartphones, and whatever software seems suitable for the tasks you hope to accomplish.
Interpersonal Skills

Success comes to those whom other people like, respect, believe, and are willing to support. That’s why people with basic interpersonal skills can expect to rise higher than others without them. These include:
  • Listening, understanding, and empathizing with others.
  • Speaking well, so others understand you and care about what you say.
  • Taking a positive point of view, the “glass half full” approach.
  • Showing enthusiasm, eagerness, and a reasonable amount of courage.
  • Getting along with others, generating good feelings, and avoiding confrontations.
  • Working well with others, including both taking direction and giving direction, when appropriate.
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    May 21st, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, Resume Writing

    How to Deal with Unemployment on a ResumeFor a while there at the beginning of this year, it was starting to look like we were entering a new period of job growth that would drastically slash the unemployment rate and herald the rebirth of prosperity.

    And then it stopped. Or at least it slowed down dramatically. The most recent jobs report showed that tens of thousands fewer jobs were created than expected, leaving unemployment hovering over 8 percent.

    Doesn’t sound like good news, does it? But at least in one way, it can be beneficial for you if you currently find yourself hunting for a job. How? Because being unemployed isn’t as big of a stigma right now as it has been in the past.

    Still, that doesn’t mean that you should call attention to gaps in your employment if you don’t have to. For small gaps in your job history, try only listing the years that you were employed at a company on your resume and omitting the months. Unless you’re expressly asked to do otherwise, it’s generally considered okay to do this, and it can be great if you’ve been unemployed for less than a year, because a prospective employer might not ever know there was a gap in your employment.

    Unfortunately, recent reports show that unemployed Americans are searching for an average of 28 weeks before they finally find work, and you probably know lots of people who have been looking for far longer. What do you put on your resume if you have this kind of hole?
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