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Archive for June, 2012

June 27th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Job Search, Resume Writing

5 Mistakes on Your Resume that Are Hurting Your Job SearchFinding the job you want has always been a tough, time-consuming task, but these days just getting any job is a difficult prospect. One of the most important tools at your disposal in your hunt for that perfect position is your resume, but if that resume is just so-so, or - worse - riddled with mistakes, you could be making yourself stand out - in a bad way. Want to know some of the worst mistakes you can make on a resume? Read on!

Typos. The person reading your resume has probably gone through several dozen - if not more! - that day, and going through resumes probably isn’t the only job they have to do. Don’t make it any harder on them by turning in a resume with misspellings and grammatical errors. If anything, you’re giving them an easy reason to pass you over.

Poor Use of Subtitles. Lots of people like to use subtitles on their resume to separate it into sections. While this is a good idea and can help to avoid clutter (which we’ll get into shortly), too many people end up using generic terms that say nothing. So next time, instead of “Employment History,” try something like “Previous Teaching Positions” or “Past Administrative Work.” Not only will this clearly show your specific experience for the current position, it will show that you cared enough to tailor your resume for them.

Font selection. It’s great that Word and other programs offer us hundred of choices for the font style we want to use, but only a dozen or so are actually helpful for general use. It may seem boring, but sticking to the old standards is way better than, say, trying to stand out and ending up with something illegible in Curlz MT.
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June 25th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice, Networking

Don't Be too Sure of YourselfHow good are you at driving a car? At judging the funniness of jokes? At evaluating the correctness of your own opinions and judgments? At measuring your own skills and knowledge?

Are you sitting down? The answer is: there’s a very good chance your answers to each and every one of those questions are dead wrong. The simple reason: when it comes to gauging our own abilities, most people stink.

In recent years, psychologists have been studying people’s abilities to recognize their own strengths and weaknesses, and have found an appalling level of incompetence, right across the board.

One researcher, David Dunning, a psychologist at Cornell University, has completed research showing quite clearly that people are very poor judges of their own abilities, from logical reasoning to emotional intelligence, from sense of humor to skill at playing chess.

Based on the results of this emerging branch of psychological research, it’s clear that whatever specific things you can and can’t do, the chances are very good that you overrate your abilities.

What’s even more interesting is that, while true experts at a specific discipline generally possess a great deal of confidence in their knowledge and abilities - and rightly so, other people who are much less accomplished in that same discipline have nearly as much self-confidence as the experts!
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June 18th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in In the Workplace

8 Rules for the Office KitchenEven if you have a private office, the workplace is a shared space. You have to be mindful that there are other people around, each trying hard - well, you hope - to do his or her job to the best of their abilities. People need to be shown respect and courtesy.

Unfortunately, rather than bringing out the best in us, shared spaces can often uncover our baser instincts of selfishness, laziness, forgetfulness, and just plain rude behavior.

Nowhere is this more apparent than in the office kitchen, and if you’ve ever had food stolen or been forced to clean up someone else’s pile of dishes, you know exactly what I’m talking about.

If you want your shared office kitchen to run smooth and avoid arguments and passive aggressive notes, there are several rules you should follow.

1. Replace empties. Doesn’t matter whether it’s an empty pot of coffee - brew another one! - or an empty water cooler, if you’re the one to get the last drop, you should fix the problem.

2. Make a list. If your kitchen is restocked by someone else in the office (a person who should become your best friend, by the way), do them a favor and put up a list that people can write on when certain items are running low like milk or peanut butter. This is also useful as a request list, but don’t go crazy.
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June 12th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Interviewing, Job Search

Make The Best Impression In Your Next Interview – Part 2 Given how monumentally difficult it is to judge a person’s ability to perform in a difficult assignment, based on just one or more short interviews, it’s counter-productive for candidates to go into a job interview nervous, worried about what kinds of questions you’ll be asked, or focused on trying to anticipate the skill sets, knowledge, experience, and personality the interviewer is looking for. Last time, we covered replacing anticipation with confidence, and excitement with leadership. Here are two more ideas to help you do better in job interviews by “reframing” the experience as a date:

Instead of thinking of an interview as an ordeal, it’s much better think of it as a date. This way, you’ll have a far easier time making a great impression and getting the interviewer to want to see you again.

(Caveat: Gals might “get” more of this date-oriented advice by translating these ideas into other situations: perhaps making a good impression on an important customer, helping your guests feel welcome at a dinner party, or leading a group that’s discussing a local hot-button issue. Find common ground and you’ll more easily find ways to accept and utilize these ideas.)


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June 5th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Interviewing

Make The Best Impression in Your Next Interview – Part 1Has it ever struck you how monumentally difficult it is to judge a person’s ability to perform an assignment based on a single interview, or even a short series of them?

Yet that’s what hiring managers and HR people are tasked with doing every time they seek to add someone new to the team.

Most candidates go into a job interview nervous, worried about what kinds of questions they’ll be asked, and focused on preparing by trying to anticipate the skills, knowledge, experience, and personality the interviewer is looking for.

Forget all that! If you can learn to think of an interview as a date, instead of an ordeal, you’ll have a far easier time making a great impression and getting the interviewer to want to see you again.

(Caveat: Much of this ‘date-related’ advice is cast in the guy’s point of view, trying to get the gal to accept and like him. Women may find this role a little unfamiliar, and thus find the advice more difficult to follow. But if you gals translate these ideas into a situation with which you’re more familiar – perhaps making a good impression on an important customer, helping your guests feel welcome at a dinner party, or leading a group that’s discussing a local hot-button issue – you’ll likely find common ground and more easily find ways to accept and utilize these ideas.)

The key is to keep the natural feelings that arise for most interviews – anticipation, excitement, uncertainty, and desire – under wraps. Instead, do your best to override them with actions that communicate your confidence, leadership, knowledge, and winning personality.
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