Resumark Blog

» Blog Home
Search
Post Resume
Post Resume
Free Resume Search
Free Resume Search
Post Jobs for Free
Post Jobs for Free
Job 2.0 Network
Job 2.0 Network










Archive for July, 2012

July 27th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, In the Workplace

Things That Affect Your ProductivityIn part 1 of this series, I started to discuss the different ways that your environment can affect the way that you work. I brought up the three types of environmental factors that researchers point to - psychological, territorial, and physical - and discussed how your own psychology can negatively impact your ability to get things done.

Today’s post will focus on the ways in which functionality and territoriality can help or harm your productivity levels. What do those two terms even mean? Read on.

Control Matters

When we go to work, sometimes it can seem like our employers want to control every little aspect of our time there. We have specific lunch times and break times. We only have access to certain filing cabinets and offices. We share a thermostat, with no way to change it. Websites and applications are blocked - and not always the ones that you would expect.

For employers, this allows them to better dictate what we will be doing and how we will be doing it. In their minds, they are helping productivity by dictating the things that we can do and have control over. In some ways, this probably does help, such as blocking time-wasting sites like Facebook that don’t really have any true work use. Unfortunately, taking too much control and “ownership” away from us can actually hurt our productivity.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

July 26th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in In the Workplace

How to Improve Workplace MoraleMaking your workforce happy probably isn’t at the top of your to-do list - but it should be! Happier workers tend to have fewer absences, less health problems overall, and higher productivity rates. In short, it just makes sense to try to keep your workers happy.

So, how can you do that? Read on for a number of tried and true methods to raise morale - while improving your company’s bottom line.

Reward, don’t punish. Motivation is a funny thing. If your employees get in trouble every time something goes wrong, their main motivation is going to be not to get yelled at. This might enable you to keep succeeding at a minimum level, but it will never go beyond this. In contrast, if you focus on rewarding good behavior and successes, employees will be more likely to try their very best.

Offer bonuses. Similar to the first suggestion, bonuses are a concrete way of showing employees that doing an exemplary job will be rewarded and encourage everyone to try harder. Not quite able to offer monetary bonuses with the economy the way it is? Try other kinds of “bonuses” like working out discounts at local businesses or allowing people to earn more time off.

Build in playtime. People burn out if they work too much, leading to apathetic workers whose only goal is to get through the day and go home. Often, these same workers will even try to escape from the drudgery of the office during work hours by surfing the net or playing games. It may seem counterintuitive, but don’t discourage this behavior - encourage it by building “playtime” into the work schedule every day for a set period of time. Some offices have even gone so far as to add foosball tables or arcade games to the office so that employees can blow off steam and clear their heads.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

July 10th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, On the Radar

How to Enjoy the Job You Currently HaveAs Americans, we’re taught to shoot for the stars. To always be looking towards the horizon for that next big thing, and never be complacent. In many ways, this is great advice. It keeps us fighting to better ourselves, get promotions, and achieve our dreams.

Unfortunately, it can also lead to us feeling unsatisfied and unable to enjoy where we are because we’re always looking to the future for happiness. Sometimes, these dissatisfied feelings can bleed into our work performance, and in the current employment climate, that is a very bad thing. With that in mind, here are a few ways for you to take a step back and realize that there are a lot of things you like about your current job, even if it’s not your dream position.

Think about the money. Chances are, you probably wish that you were making more. Fair enough. But if you asked him, even someone like Donald Trump would probably say he wished he was making more money. We don’t stop dreaming for more, but that doesn’t mean you can’t be thankful of what you have - a steady paycheck coming in that allows you to cover your expenses and keep dreaming.

Relish the security and stability. If you’re a person thinking about striking out on your own as a freelancer or with a small business, think about all the worries and stresses that come with that. It’s not just money that may fluctuate from week to week, but the ability of this new career or business to work out at all. Most likely, your current job is relatively stable and secure, even if it doesn’t seem to be leading anywhere.

Enjoy friendships and relationships. Even if you don’t like your job or your boss, most likely there are people you work with that you consider friends. If the work itself is beating you down, concentrate on these relationships. You might end up finding ways to help each other and make work (and life) more bearable.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

July 6th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice, On the Radar

How to Be More InfluentialBecause people are inherently social, which means we operate in groups, the ability to influence others brings major advantages to anyone who possesses it. Influential power helps you gain support for your ideas, appreciation for your efforts, and recognition for your strengths and other constructive attributes.

Some of us are born with extraordinary power to influence large numbers of people. But that’s not the only way to be influential. Nearly anyone can learn to increase their native power to influence others by understanding a few simple human traits.

Here’s how:

Look To Give As Well  As Get

People have a natural tendency to reciprocate: to return a favor, help those who help us, fall in line behind those we treat us well, and so forth. That’s why one of the easiest ways to influence people is to offer them something they want in return for their cooperation with you.

Start Easy

If you ask someone to switch from going about their own business to putting in an extreme effort on your behalf, you’re likely to obtain very little cooperation. But you can often elicit that extreme effort a different way: by asking for very little as a first step. Then you can ask for a little more, and a little more, increasing your requests by easy stages.

For a variety of reasons, people have a tendency to follow through on what they start. So once you influence a person to, say, pick a few dead leaves off your rose bush, they’re more likely to agree, in easy stages - but eventually, to mow your entire lawn.
Read this »

  • Share/Bookmark

Share