Resumark Blog

» Blog Home
Search
Post Resume
Post Resume
Free Resume Search
Free Resume Search
Post Jobs for Free
Post Jobs for Free
Job 2.0 Network
Job 2.0 Network










Archive for August, 2012

August 22nd, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, Resume Writing

How Long Should Your Resume Be?Generally, the answer is: as short as it can be. Some people belong to the school of thought that anything over a page is simply too long. It’s just one resume among a pile of dozens or hundreds more, so you need to make your case fast before they move on to the next one.

But here’s the thing: you also don’t want to leave off key experience because you’re trying to artificially cram everything onto one page. The key is to highlight the relevant experience, skills, education, and attributes, and for some, this may require two pages. In the case of senior executives with a lot of time in the workforce, your resume may even be longer. However, if you’re a recent college graduate or someone with just a few years of work experience, there’s no reason to have a resume over one page.

Some people incorrectly believe that having a longer resume will make them look more qualified or accomplished, but if you don’t actually have the experience, simply making it longer won’t fool anyone. In fact, it will just take them longer to get to the information that is relevant and may end up in you being passed over for the position.

What You Can Cut

So how do you know if your resume is as short as it can be? Look it over to see what’s extraneous. Each section and each item should be a selling point that gives the potential employer evidence that you are the right candidate. Here are a few common places where you may be able to cut down - or remove things altogether.

References

It’s no longer customary to include your references on your resume, so this is a great section to cut. If your employer is interested in contacting people for recommendations, you can provide them on a separate sheet. Similarly, you don’t need to include a line that says, “References available upon request.” The potential employer will assume this is the case.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

August 20th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice, In the Workplace

AccountablilityIt doesn’t take a genius to look around our world and see that it’s sorely lacking in accountability. People in both prominent and obscure situations say and do the strangest things, and rarely are they held fully accountable.

That’s a real problem, particularly in the practical worlds of jobs, business, and the professions, but also in human relations.

Whether you’re leading a team or simply managing your own life, you can kick up the levels of effectiveness, responsibility, and success by practicing (and where possible, encouraging in others) meaningful accountability.

Here are some guidelines to help you:

Stop Ducking Responsibility

We live in an intertwined world, so it’s rare that a simple, single cause (”I overslept”) can result in a problem, a missed deadline, or a lost opportunity. Sure, it can happen. But, it doesn’t have to happen to you.

Practice accountability by taking meaningful steps to honor your commitments and live up to your responsibilities. If you take these seriously enough, you can be pretty sure you’ll never have to say “it’s entirely my fault”.

Set Up Accountable Situations

Airplane maintenance is a wonderful example of how to set up an accountable situation. Every maintenance procedure is clearly spelled out, and every mechanic who performs a procedure must attest to what he or she did with a signed and dated form. Many procedures also require a supervisor to check the work and sign to affirm his or her approval.

If you’re not in a life-and-death situation, you may not need such a rigorous, formal system. But you increase accountability when you have a plan of action with clear steps to be followed, and when you are careful to follow that plan. It’s even more accountable to have multiple layers of inspection and supervision.

With such a plan in place, results can more easily be traced back to the plan, and to everyone who implemented it. Whether the results are positive or negative, there’s clear accountability.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

August 9th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Resume Writing

Dynamic LaptopThe next time you update your resume, you may want to consider going online - and not just to look for sample resumes to emulate! Some companies, particularly those in the tech and finance industries, are now requesting digital resumes.

What exactly does that mean? Well, instead of sending them a PDF or Word doc attachment, they want candidates for their positions to send along a link (or links) to their web presence. Even if a position you are applying to doesn’t request  a digital resume, sending one along with your traditional resume can help you stand out from the crowd. That’s never a bad idea, but in this crowded job market it’s practically a necessity. It also has the added advantage of showing that you are web savvy, an important skill in most workplaces today.

So what exactly is a digital resume, and what do employers expect you to include? This is a new format, so there are no set standards like there are for traditional resumes. What one company means by “digital resume” can be very different from another’s idea.

While this may seem overwhelming and confusing at first, it’s actually a wonderful opportunity for you to get creative and highlight your particular strengths.  Here are two of the most popular formats for digital resumes.

LinkedIn

The most basic digital resume is LinkedIn, which is a site that allows you to list your work history, skills, etc., just like you would on a traditional resume. It’s also a social network that allows you to easily connect with people in your field. Many people include the URL for their LinkedIn page on their business cards, providing people with an easy way to discover their work history.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share