Resumark Blog

» Blog Home
Search
Post Resume
Post Resume
Free Resume Search
Free Resume Search
Post Jobs for Free
Post Jobs for Free
Job 2.0 Network
Job 2.0 Network










Author Archive

April 9th, 2012 by Linda White   Posted in Career Advice, Unemployment

Handling the Ups and Downs of a Job SearchThe New Year’s gloss is off the year: the resolutions are broken (or mostly) and the time is zipping by. When you are job hunting, it’s hard to look at a blank slate and fill it with promising dreams. If you are feeling beat up by the job search and thinking that blank slate is a bad thing, read on.

Keeping yourself motivated during any job search can be difficult. But this is especially true during a very long, protracted job search in a bad economy. The ups and downs can be as difficult to handle as finding the jobs to apply for. You’re buoyed by each new call for an interview, apprehensive when called for second interviews, and crushed when the call comes that you were one of two finalists - and it didn’t go your way. If you feel as though you are marked with a big red L on your forehead, or you are frustrated by jumping through all the hoops only to be told no, you are not alone. What you need are a few coping strategies, and a little dose of reality.

Don’t bank on one opportunity

Even if it’s the job of your dreams - especially if it’s the job of your dreams - do not stop applying for other jobs. Keep your foot in the game and continue to be responsive and enthusiastic about other opportunities. We all know not to count our chickens before they’re hatched, but it’s so tempting when things seem to be lining up. Remember, you don’t have the job until an offer has been made, and sometimes, not even then.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

March 6th, 2012 by Linda White   Posted in Unemployment

Three things you need to know about unemployment benefitsThere are many different rules that apply to unemployment benefits. The laws vary state by state, and the interpretation of the laws is open to human prejudices and opinion. Before you do anything, you should check the laws where you live, based on your own situation. And if you have an open case, talk to your case worker. They are there to help you.

Having worked for the office that ran the unemployment program in Minnesota, I facilitated the processing of hundreds of claims. Literally. This was during 2002, when the economy was bad. But not as bad as it seems to be for the unemployed right now. I did what was called “adjudicating” claims: making decisions about a claimant’s eligibility based on unemployment law and the evidence provided.

There were many common misperceptions that I saw, and many mistakes that I watched people make over and over again.

First of all, in most states and in most cases, if you are laid off, you are eligible for unemployment benefits. Pretty cut and dry. You are out of work through no fault of your own. But many people don’t know that if you are fired due to incompetence, you are also considered out of work through no fault of your own. That is, if you were trying to do the job and simply couldn’t cut it, you are eligible.

Most people take this as a point of pride. Don’t. You may have had an incredibly unreasonable boss. Communication may have been abysmal. You may have gotten mixed signals, or had one of those bosses who expected you to read his or her mind. Whatever the reason, even if you know that you are a good worker and that you were capable of doing the job, if the employer states that you were incompetent, take it. They know the laws too. They are fixing it so that you can collect unemployment benefits. I can’t tell you how many people argued against that, potentially hurting their own case, simply to save their own pride.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

November 7th, 2011 by Linda White   Posted in Interviewing, Job Search, Recruiting & Hiring

They Hire You Because They Like YouAll other things being equal, how do you get a job in a cutthroat, tight job economy like this one? While indeed you do need to have the skills presented in the position description and be able to fulfill the job needs, one of the most basic truths of human behavior is that the more likeable you are, the more likely it is that you will be hired.

So how do you present yourself as likeable? Well, it’s true that it is not something you can fake. The key, though, is simply to be yourself. There is no point in being nervous. Just walk in as if you are meant to be there. Presenting yourself with confidence and without negativity will get you half the way to hearing, “You’re hired.”

Think about what qualities attract you to people. What are your friends like? Are they easy-going, quick to smile, and can they articulate their thoughts well? These are the same qualities that an employer is looking for in a job candidate. Here are a few tips to help smooth your way:

Dress for success - studies show that 45% of employer decisions are based on appearance.

Present yourself well - this includes being prepared, answering questions fully without rambling, and asking good questions. Have at least five questions prepared in advance that you can ask. Answer questions with confidence.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

November 1st, 2011 by Linda White   Posted in Career Advice, Job Search

your-money-your-lifeOne of my favorite books regarding work life is called Your Money or Your Life by Joe Dominguez and Vicki Robin. While it doesn’t have all the answers, it did open my eyes to the idea that each moment is a trade-off. Our society has agreed that we will trade money for time. So why not make that trade as beneficial as it can be?

Your Money or Your Life is not new. It was first published in 1992, during “a period of widespread financial uncertainty.” Oh really? I have bought two copies - the first one I gave away. It helps to prioritize things - figure out how you should spend your time, maybe even what your life is worth and what is important.

It may help you figure out if the job you are doing is really worth it. There are different ways to be rewarded, to be sure. But if we have implicitly agreed on this money for time swap, then it makes sense to really think about what you are doing with your time.

The concept may be very useful when looking for a job. Sure, you go through the postings and say, “I could do that.” But don’t just think that. Think instead, “Do I want to do that?” There are many jobs that any reasonable person could do. But try to aim for only those that you feel would best use your talents and skills. And that might even be interesting. Yes, even in a tough market. Because a tough market is the one in which you are more likely to make decisions that you will regret later, when you are stuck doing something that feels like a waste of time.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 


istock_000005664495xsmallRecently I’ve been helping my son write a cover letter for a prospective internship. He’s in college, and this is the first cover letter he’s ever had to write. Cover letters may seem like a throwaway thing, just somewhere to put the hiring manager’s name, but that could not be further from the truth. Here are a few tips for recent grads, those who have not had to write cover letters for years, or anyone looking for a refresher on this oh-so-important job hunting tool.

Keep it short and pertinent

Keep your cover letter to one page. No matter what. Even if you have the most interesting stories to tell, no one will read past the first page. They are scanning. Only when you grab the hiring manager will they slow down enough to read the actual letter. How to grab them? Start out by telling them you know what they need, and you are that solution. If you know of a new initiative that company is undergoing, state it here. If you think it’s an exciting time to be working for them, tell them so.

Continue in the second paragraph by showing them how your experience fits with what they need. Two short examples from recent experiences. These don’t have to be work experience; they could be volunteer work or school projects or club activities.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

« Older Entries
« Previous
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10