Resumark Blog

» Blog Home
Search
Post Resume
Post Resume
Free Resume Search
Free Resume Search
Post Jobs for Free
Post Jobs for Free
Job 2.0 Network
Job 2.0 Network










Author Archive

October 5th, 2010 by Sergey Novoselov   Posted in Humor

  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

September 7th, 2010 by Sergey Novoselov   Posted in Salary & Finances, Unemployment

Highest-Paid CEOsCEOs of the 50 U.S. firms that cut the most jobs during the recession earned 42% more than the average S&P 500 firm CEO, according to a study released by a liberal think tank in Washington.

The study also found that 36 of the 50 layoff leaders announced their layoffs at a time of positive earnings reports, suggesting a trend of squeezing workers to boost profits and to maintain high CEO pay. When CEOs cut jobs they are often very richly rewarded.

No Wall Street banks were included in this list, but three banks (Bank Of America, Citigroup and JP Morgan) were on the list of the 50 firms that laid off the most employees.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

August 24th, 2010 by Sergey Novoselov   Posted in Career Advice, Job News, Job Search, Salary & Finances

GraduationThis year is tough for college graduates looking to enter the job market. Even more than last year: a study shows a 1.7 percent decline in the salaries offered for entry-level positions when compared with the same time last year. 2010 colledge grads can expect an average offer of $47,673, compared with $48,515 in 2009.

However there are still careers where the median starting salary is above the average. Let’s review the top ten jobs that offer the highest starting pay:

1. Engineering (median starting salary $53,400)

Engineers use math and science to develop solutions to technical problems. There are many specialties, including industrial engineers, aerospace, and biomedical. A steady growth is expected in this field.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

August 10th, 2010 by Sergey Novoselov   Posted in Employee Rights, Job News, Unemployment

Where are the jobs?Despite President Obama’s pledge to retain hi-tech jobs in the U.S., the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has launched a $36 million campaign to train workers, including 3,000 specialists in IT and related functions, in South Asia, InformationWeek reports.  Later we learned that USAID also launched a similar program in Armenia.

After their training, the tech workers will be hired by outsourcing vendors that provide offshore IT and business services to American companies looking to take advantage of the low labor costs.

Under President Obama’s appointee director Rajiv Shah, USAID will partner with private outsourcers in other countries to teach workers advanced IT skills like Enterprise Java (Java EE) programming, as well as business process outsourcing and call center support. USAID will also help them improve their English language skills.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

July 27th, 2010 by Sergey Novoselov   Posted in Employee Rights, Job News, Unemployment

Don't let a pink slip ruin your dayThe United States used to have the largest and most prosperous middle class in the world, but now that is changing and the rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer at a blinding speed.

The main reason for such fundamental changes is the side effects of the globalism and “free trade” that our leaders insisted would be so good for us. It turned out that they forgot to tell us that in “global economy” American workers would eventually have to directly compete for jobs with people in other countries with no minimum wage and few other regulations. Over the last several decades the big global corporations have greatly benefited by exploiting third world labor, but more and more middle class Americans have found things to be very tough.

Most people have nothing to offer in the marketplace other than their labor and absolutely dependent on someone else giving them a job. U.S. workers are much less attractive today compared to the rest of the world. They are extremely expensive, and the government keeps passing regulations that makes it even more difficult to conduct business in the United States. Therefore large corporations are moving operations out of the U.S. and, since the U.S. government does not penalize them for doing so, there is no incentive for them to stay.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

« Older Entries
« Previous
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10