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Author Archive

December 9th, 2010 by Guest Author   Posted in In the Workplace

 It can be difficult to fully let yourself go in your work environment, whether you’ve just started at a new company or you’ve been in your current position for several months or several years. No matter the atmosphere of your office, it is crucial to maintain your professionalism. It is key, too, though, to allow your own distinct personality to shine through the professional surface. Your unique character can be an asset in the workplace, so make sure that you display it to the very best of your ability, without losing that professional edge.

Walk the fine line between fun, free and polished by following the few rules below in your place of work:

1.  Socialize with co-workers, but not too much. It can be wonderful to have close friends around you every day at work – friends help you to release stress, to laugh of mishaps and bad days – but it is also important to keep yourself somewhat guarded, and refrain from sharing every bit of private information with every person in your organization. Enjoy the company of the people you work with, but also watch yourself and maintain a certain level of professionalism, even when outside the office.
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July 18th, 2010 by Guest Author   Posted in Humor

Work-Life BalanceFor many of us - work is a necessity but not really something that we find immensely satisfying to do. However, we have fixed hours of the day in which we are expected to turn up into the office and ‘work’. For some people this is hard to do! It’s difficult to maintain focus and it’s difficult to keep progressing on something that isn’t fun or interesting. In some cases there simply isn’t enough to keep us busy! - So here are some ‘fun’ ways to pretend that you’re working (now don’t quote me on these or ‘take them seriously’ as words of proper careers advice-it’s just some food for thought to get you through the day!):

1. Type loudly on your keyboard with a steady rhythm

2. Hunch over your keyboard like you’re really concentrating

3. Automate email sending (especially late at night)
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July 15th, 2010 by Guest Author   Posted in Interviewing, Job Search, Most Popular

Career MoveI hate phone interviews! I find it extremely difficult to make a connection with a stranger without being able to look in their eyes and read their body language. Given the choice between a root canal and a phone interview, I would choose the root canal, since the dentist at least gives you Novocain. But phone interviews are now the norm, even for many local jobs, so here are a few tips I have learned the hard way:

Screen your phone calls: If you don’t recognize the number, let your voicemail pick it up. There are several reasons not to answer that first phone call. Some interviewers will want to do an immediate interview, and it is not to your advantage to do even a casual interview without some preparation. You will also avoid the chance of embarrassing interruptions. I have had my cell phone run out of batteries while talking to an interviewer, leaving a very unprofessional impression. Also, if you let the interviewer leave a voicemail, you now have the interviewer’s name and phone number. This eliminates the possibility that you will fail to hear the name correctly, or will forget it, making it difficult to contact the interviewer later. Finally, with a message you know what the interviewer wants and can prepare accordingly. If they are looking to schedule a phone or in-person interview, you can have your schedule ready when you call back. If they say something more vague, like “I would like to speak to you about the position you applied for at XYZ Corp.”, you can expect a full phone interview and prepare accordingly.
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July 8th, 2010 by Guest Author   Posted in Job Search

Work Smarter Not HarderAre you looking for a new job but don’t want to have to move or go that far? Then why not look at the options available within your current organization?

When exploring opportunities within your current business you may want to look at possible promotions in your team or department. Look at what is going on in other areas and what opportunities there are for you across the company. There may also be international opportunities to explore if that interests you. Certain offices abroad may be dying to have a talented individual in your field move over to them or they might be struggling to hire into a certain area that you could try out. As an existing employee of the organization, you will be in a much stronger position than an outsider to find and land those roles.

Here are seven ways to find fresh opportunities within your organization by tapping into its resources:

1 . Attend company presentations – This is a great way to meet people within the business who could be helpful to you. Try to understand what’s going on and sieve out potential areas of development or areas where you might be able to add value.
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June 24th, 2010 by Guest Author   Posted in Unemployment

jobs-search-overloadAt the start of my job hunt I didn’t take advantage of the services at my local office of the State Employment Service.  I assumed their services were geared only to entry level or blue-collar workers.  But after several less than stellar interviews, I called the office of Job and Family Services in my county to see if they offered any coaching or classes on interview skills.  I took a class on general interviewing tips, then the Interview Practicum.  The class covered the usual topics with some interesting information on high-pressure interview situations.  The practicum was just what I was looking for.  Since I was the only person to show up, I had a one on one coaching session on how to answer tough interview questions.  A mock interview was videotaped so we could play it back and discuss each answer.  The instructor had real world business and management experience, and had some great insights on ways to improve my interview performance.


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