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Archive for the ‘Interviewing’ Category

June 12th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Interviewing, Job Search

Make The Best Impression In Your Next Interview – Part 2 Given how monumentally difficult it is to judge a person’s ability to perform in a difficult assignment, based on just one or more short interviews, it’s counter-productive for candidates to go into a job interview nervous, worried about what kinds of questions you’ll be asked, or focused on trying to anticipate the skill sets, knowledge, experience, and personality the interviewer is looking for. Last time, we covered replacing anticipation with confidence, and excitement with leadership. Here are two more ideas to help you do better in job interviews by “reframing” the experience as a date:

Instead of thinking of an interview as an ordeal, it’s much better think of it as a date. This way, you’ll have a far easier time making a great impression and getting the interviewer to want to see you again.

(Caveat: Gals might “get” more of this date-oriented advice by translating these ideas into other situations: perhaps making a good impression on an important customer, helping your guests feel welcome at a dinner party, or leading a group that’s discussing a local hot-button issue. Find common ground and you’ll more easily find ways to accept and utilize these ideas.)


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June 5th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Interviewing

Make The Best Impression in Your Next Interview – Part 1Has it ever struck you how monumentally difficult it is to judge a person’s ability to perform an assignment based on a single interview, or even a short series of them?

Yet that’s what hiring managers and HR people are tasked with doing every time they seek to add someone new to the team.

Most candidates go into a job interview nervous, worried about what kinds of questions they’ll be asked, and focused on preparing by trying to anticipate the skills, knowledge, experience, and personality the interviewer is looking for.

Forget all that! If you can learn to think of an interview as a date, instead of an ordeal, you’ll have a far easier time making a great impression and getting the interviewer to want to see you again.

(Caveat: Much of this ‘date-related’ advice is cast in the guy’s point of view, trying to get the gal to accept and like him. Women may find this role a little unfamiliar, and thus find the advice more difficult to follow. But if you gals translate these ideas into a situation with which you’re more familiar – perhaps making a good impression on an important customer, helping your guests feel welcome at a dinner party, or leading a group that’s discussing a local hot-button issue – you’ll likely find common ground and more easily find ways to accept and utilize these ideas.)

The key is to keep the natural feelings that arise for most interviews – anticipation, excitement, uncertainty, and desire – under wraps. Instead, do your best to override them with actions that communicate your confidence, leadership, knowledge, and winning personality.
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March 8th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice, Interviewing, Job Search

Find Out More about Prospective Employers“We’d like to offer you a position.”

Those are great words to hear, particularly if - like many jobseekers - you’ve been looking for work longer than you’ve ever had to look before.

But while the urge to say “Yes” will undoubtedly be strong the next time you hear those words, you shouldn’t accept without knowing a good deal about your prospective employer. You can, of course, wait to do all this research until after you’ve been offered a job. But there are at least two good reasons not to wait:

1. Some of the information you dig up will help you look good to a hiring manager.

2. Some of it will also help you decide whether, and how, to best pursue a job with this employer.

Regardless of when you want to dig up each tidbit of information, here’s a rundown of what you probably want to know about a prospective employer, and where to find it:

Obviously, you’ll want to know the basics:

-Locations

-Main business activities

-Products and services

You can find most of this just by looking in the yellow pages.

But you’ll also want to know much more.

Competitiveness For example, how does your prospective employer (PE) stack up against the competition? To find out, visit your PE’s website and familiarize yourself with the branding and marketing information displayed there. Take a look at your PE’s pricing structure, guarantees or warranties, and how it positions itself. Depending on what your PE sells, you may also want to approach the company as a customer would, and try to get a perspective on how the company is seen by those who spend money to keep it going.

Then briefly do the same for your PE’s major competitors. After you’ve done this round of research, carefully consider which company in your PE’s industry or market niche is doing the best job.
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February 15th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, Interviewing

How to Explain Getting Fired To state the obvious, no one likes getting fired. But as uncomfortable as that can be, talking about it in the interview for your next (hopeful) job might be even worse. You don’t want to lie, but you definitely want to make sure you come out sounding good - or at least like you understand what went wrong and have learned from it.

In fact, most people try to avoid talking about it at all, but this can lead to an even bigger problem and far more discomfort if the interviewer discovers that you weren’t being honest with them. So how exactly do you broach the subject?

Don’t blame. Think about the person across the table from you. It’s quite possible that they have had to fire people before, and learning that you were let go from your last job will likely dredge up those memories. Just like no one likes to get fired, no one really enjoys the job of firing someone either. If your explanation of why you got fired is mostly an exercise in blaming the people who fired you, it’s only going to make your interview see you as a difficult person and dread the possibility of having such a conversation with you.

Show that you’ve learned. Rather than blaming, say that it was a good learning experience and detail how it has helped you to grow as a person and an employee. What you say will depend on the job and the reason you were let go, but this is your chance to show that you own your mistakes and take responsibility - two things most employers respect.
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November 7th, 2011 by Linda White   Posted in Interviewing, Job Search, Recruiting & Hiring

They Hire You Because They Like YouAll other things being equal, how do you get a job in a cutthroat, tight job economy like this one? While indeed you do need to have the skills presented in the position description and be able to fulfill the job needs, one of the most basic truths of human behavior is that the more likeable you are, the more likely it is that you will be hired.

So how do you present yourself as likeable? Well, it’s true that it is not something you can fake. The key, though, is simply to be yourself. There is no point in being nervous. Just walk in as if you are meant to be there. Presenting yourself with confidence and without negativity will get you half the way to hearing, “You’re hired.”

Think about what qualities attract you to people. What are your friends like? Are they easy-going, quick to smile, and can they articulate their thoughts well? These are the same qualities that an employer is looking for in a job candidate. Here are a few tips to help smooth your way:

Dress for success - studies show that 45% of employer decisions are based on appearance.

Present yourself well - this includes being prepared, answering questions fully without rambling, and asking good questions. Have at least five questions prepared in advance that you can ask. Answer questions with confidence.
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