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Archive for the ‘Job Search’ Category

June 27th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Job Search, Resume Writing

5 Mistakes on Your Resume that Are Hurting Your Job SearchFinding the job you want has always been a tough, time-consuming task, but these days just getting any job is a difficult prospect. One of the most important tools at your disposal in your hunt for that perfect position is your resume, but if that resume is just so-so, or - worse - riddled with mistakes, you could be making yourself stand out - in a bad way. Want to know some of the worst mistakes you can make on a resume? Read on!

Typos. The person reading your resume has probably gone through several dozen - if not more! - that day, and going through resumes probably isn’t the only job they have to do. Don’t make it any harder on them by turning in a resume with misspellings and grammatical errors. If anything, you’re giving them an easy reason to pass you over.

Poor Use of Subtitles. Lots of people like to use subtitles on their resume to separate it into sections. While this is a good idea and can help to avoid clutter (which we’ll get into shortly), too many people end up using generic terms that say nothing. So next time, instead of “Employment History,” try something like “Previous Teaching Positions” or “Past Administrative Work.” Not only will this clearly show your specific experience for the current position, it will show that you cared enough to tailor your resume for them.

Font selection. It’s great that Word and other programs offer us hundred of choices for the font style we want to use, but only a dozen or so are actually helpful for general use. It may seem boring, but sticking to the old standards is way better than, say, trying to stand out and ending up with something illegible in Curlz MT.
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June 12th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Interviewing, Job Search

Make The Best Impression In Your Next Interview – Part 2 Given how monumentally difficult it is to judge a person’s ability to perform in a difficult assignment, based on just one or more short interviews, it’s counter-productive for candidates to go into a job interview nervous, worried about what kinds of questions you’ll be asked, or focused on trying to anticipate the skill sets, knowledge, experience, and personality the interviewer is looking for. Last time, we covered replacing anticipation with confidence, and excitement with leadership. Here are two more ideas to help you do better in job interviews by “reframing” the experience as a date:

Instead of thinking of an interview as an ordeal, it’s much better think of it as a date. This way, you’ll have a far easier time making a great impression and getting the interviewer to want to see you again.

(Caveat: Gals might “get” more of this date-oriented advice by translating these ideas into other situations: perhaps making a good impression on an important customer, helping your guests feel welcome at a dinner party, or leading a group that’s discussing a local hot-button issue. Find common ground and you’ll more easily find ways to accept and utilize these ideas.)


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May 18th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice, Job Search, Networking

Getting Back Into Your Field: Re-entering the Workforce and/or Your Previous CareerIn today’s job market, any candidate who has been temporarily out of work (whether for child-rearing, lay off, or any other reason) or who has been working on a different career track for the past few years faces tougher-than-normal scrutiny when looking for work along their previous career path. With so many highly-qualified applicants for every decent job, hiring managers simply don’t want to take the time or trouble to consider anyone whose career history is even slightly off-target from the position they’re seeking to fill.

However, if you use the right strategies, you can usually make this situation work out well. Here are some ways to earn the best chance of being hired for a job that’s not directly in line with your recent career trajectory:

1. Ask your personal contacts, your friends and your family about possible connections that can lead you toward the career specialization, industry, or companies you’re aiming for. When you simply apply to publicly advertised jobs, you’re competing with people who have the straight-line, uninterrupted career path you lack. But when you find out about a position through personal contacts, you have a leg up on most of the other candidates, and your lack of recent career-specific background may cease to be a problem.

2.Prepare your case for overall career relevance. Think long and hard about your off-target history, and develop solid reasons why those recent activities - either the work and goals you have been accomplishing, or the non-work activities you have been pursuing - have a lot of relevance and carry-over to whatever position you’re now hoping to obtain. Put together a simple, clear, compelling story that explains why your off-target background makes you a better candidate than before.
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April 24th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Job Search, Networking

Can Blogging Help Your Job Search?You’ve likely heard about companies firing their employers for complaining about their jobs (or sometimes even just mentioning them) in their personal blogs. What you don’t hear as much about are the success stories. People who attract the attention of employers through their blogging.

Why would blogging make employers think that you’re the person for them? Maintaining a blog requires a certain kind of skillset and can translate into a number of workplace environments.

You have to know how to market… Obviously great for marketing positions, but really in any industry where you might be creating a presentation about something for your bosses (or their bosses), this is a great skill to have.

…and network. The way to get more hits on your blog is that same way you get ahead in the business world: network with the right people who are able and willing to lend a helping hand in exchange for you doing the same.

You have to be able to build and maintain relationships. In other words - people skills. Sure, you’re dealing with your readers virtually, but a lot of the same manners and protocols apply that do in the work place. Good people skills are always a sought-after skill.

You have to be able to clearly communicate. This applies to, oh, just about every job anywhere. Unless you’re working completely alone, you’ll need to talk to coworkers, delegate effectively to people below you, and explain to your superiors why you did or didn’t do what they asked of you. People who communicate well tend to do well.
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April 20th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Job Search, Recruiting & Hiring, Resume Writing

Use Twitter for Job HuntingThe advice is well known: as soon as you’re back on the streets, looking for work, you:
  • Update your resume
  • Tweak your LinkedIn profile
  • Browse the job boards
  • Apply to every open position that makes sense
  • Tell family, friends and professional colleagues that you’re looking
But there’s more you can do: Although Twitter is best known for silly, superficial, in-the-moment communications among people who know each other personally, it’s increasingly coming into use as a networking medium among people who have never met.

With Twitter accumulating active, involved users at a breath-taking pace, there are starting to be ways to use this communications channel for job hunting - ways that didn’t exist just a short time ago.

These include:

1) Tweet your needs to your friends and followers. It’s smart to use Twitter to let everyone in your network know you’re back in the hunt for a good position. Not only may you reach people not included in LinkedIn, Facebook, and your other networks, people who tweet are often an active, plugged-in group. In many cases, your contacts on Twitter will quickly offer you strong leads, or at least useful contacts, you can pursue as you search for your next job.
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