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Archive for the ‘On the Radar’ Category

July 10th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, On the Radar

How to Enjoy the Job You Currently HaveAs Americans, we’re taught to shoot for the stars. To always be looking towards the horizon for that next big thing, and never be complacent. In many ways, this is great advice. It keeps us fighting to better ourselves, get promotions, and achieve our dreams.

Unfortunately, it can also lead to us feeling unsatisfied and unable to enjoy where we are because we’re always looking to the future for happiness. Sometimes, these dissatisfied feelings can bleed into our work performance, and in the current employment climate, that is a very bad thing. With that in mind, here are a few ways for you to take a step back and realize that there are a lot of things you like about your current job, even if it’s not your dream position.

Think about the money. Chances are, you probably wish that you were making more. Fair enough. But if you asked him, even someone like Donald Trump would probably say he wished he was making more money. We don’t stop dreaming for more, but that doesn’t mean you can’t be thankful of what you have - a steady paycheck coming in that allows you to cover your expenses and keep dreaming.

Relish the security and stability. If you’re a person thinking about striking out on your own as a freelancer or with a small business, think about all the worries and stresses that come with that. It’s not just money that may fluctuate from week to week, but the ability of this new career or business to work out at all. Most likely, your current job is relatively stable and secure, even if it doesn’t seem to be leading anywhere.

Enjoy friendships and relationships. Even if you don’t like your job or your boss, most likely there are people you work with that you consider friends. If the work itself is beating you down, concentrate on these relationships. You might end up finding ways to help each other and make work (and life) more bearable.
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July 6th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice, On the Radar

How to Be More InfluentialBecause people are inherently social, which means we operate in groups, the ability to influence others brings major advantages to anyone who possesses it. Influential power helps you gain support for your ideas, appreciation for your efforts, and recognition for your strengths and other constructive attributes.

Some of us are born with extraordinary power to influence large numbers of people. But that’s not the only way to be influential. Nearly anyone can learn to increase their native power to influence others by understanding a few simple human traits.

Here’s how:

Look To Give As Well  As Get

People have a natural tendency to reciprocate: to return a favor, help those who help us, fall in line behind those we treat us well, and so forth. That’s why one of the easiest ways to influence people is to offer them something they want in return for their cooperation with you.

Start Easy

If you ask someone to switch from going about their own business to putting in an extreme effort on your behalf, you’re likely to obtain very little cooperation. But you can often elicit that extreme effort a different way: by asking for very little as a first step. Then you can ask for a little more, and a little more, increasing your requests by easy stages.

For a variety of reasons, people have a tendency to follow through on what they start. So once you influence a person to, say, pick a few dead leaves off your rose bush, they’re more likely to agree, in easy stages - but eventually, to mow your entire lawn.
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Setting Rules for Social MediaWhen social media in the workplace is discussed on most media outlets, they tend to focus on the downside: employees who badmouth their bosses or company secrets getting leaked. This has led companies to ban the use of social networks outright, but this isn’t always the right decision.

For many companies, having employees tweeting and posting about the company can be a good thing. A really good thing. After all, it’s free marketing! Also, employees can use social networks to get inspired, do research, and learn more about their field.

Plus, a ban at the workplace doesn’t keep people from posting about the company from home, and many employees may be confused about what is or isn’t allowed. That’s why it’s important to have a social media policy as part of your employee handbook. But where do you start?

Encourage employees to get involved. It’s likely they are already, and you can harness the power of all their connections for the good of your company. Also, by presenting your social media policy in a positive light, you’re less likely to get backlash from employees. Explain that you are developing a policy to clear up any confusion for employees and encourage them to ask questions about any concerns they have.
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February 21st, 2012 by Danielle Kogan   Posted in Job News, On the Radar

Does your career hit the mark?
Via: CollegeOnline.org
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February 7th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in In the Workplace, On the Radar

Job SharingWhile the current job market has made even finding paying work difficult for many people, there are still a number of workers out there who simply have too much to do in their position, often due to responsibilities at home.

One option that’s becoming increasingly available is the process of job sharing. What’s job sharing? Well, it’s pretty much what it sounds like. Instead of one person having to do a job, some people are exploring the process of splitting a single full-time job between two people.

Now, people out of work probably aren’t going to benefit directly from job sharing. When a position is split, it tends to happen between two people already working at the company who both need to cut back on their hours and responsibilities. That being said, job sharing by its nature means that two people who were previously doing two different jobs will now be doing one, which by anyone’s math should tell you that there will be an opening.

So, is job sharing right for you? There are many factors to consider before going to your boss and proposing it.

Do you have a partner in crime? While it’s possible that you could mention the idea to your boss and they’ll either know someone or start looking for you, it would put you in a far better position if you already know someone in the company who’s willing to split your job with you. The other reason to find this person yourself is that they are essentially going to be your new partner. To do the job well, you’re going to have to trust them with everything you know and feel very comfortable with each other.
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