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Archive for the ‘Recruiting & Hiring’ Category

April 20th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Job Search, Recruiting & Hiring, Resume Writing

Use Twitter for Job HuntingThe advice is well known: as soon as you’re back on the streets, looking for work, you:
  • Update your resume
  • Tweak your LinkedIn profile
  • Browse the job boards
  • Apply to every open position that makes sense
  • Tell family, friends and professional colleagues that you’re looking
But there’s more you can do: Although Twitter is best known for silly, superficial, in-the-moment communications among people who know each other personally, it’s increasingly coming into use as a networking medium among people who have never met.

With Twitter accumulating active, involved users at a breath-taking pace, there are starting to be ways to use this communications channel for job hunting - ways that didn’t exist just a short time ago.

These include:

1) Tweet your needs to your friends and followers. It’s smart to use Twitter to let everyone in your network know you’re back in the hunt for a good position. Not only may you reach people not included in LinkedIn, Facebook, and your other networks, people who tweet are often an active, plugged-in group. In many cases, your contacts on Twitter will quickly offer you strong leads, or at least useful contacts, you can pursue as you search for your next job.
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January 25th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, Recruiting & Hiring

What to Consider When You Receive a Job OfferIn this economy, getting a job offer is a big accomplishment, and sometimes people jump the gun and say yes without fully understanding what they are agreeing to. As a result, you can get into a job that’s not the right fit, or leave money sitting on the table. Instead, it is in your best interest to get details on what is being offered and to take time to thoroughly look through it.

What are the job responsibilities? Hopefully, you got most of your questions answered during the interview process, but now’s the time to ensure you understand what you will be doing in this position. Don’t be afraid to ask for clarification or even that the job requirements be put into writing.

Is there room for advancement? If you left your last job because you didn’t see a future there, don’t get yourself into the same situation again. You can ask to talk to someone in human resources about the different career paths and opportunities available at the company.

Why did the last person leave? You don’t need to ask your new boss this outright if you don’t feel comfortable. Instead, you can request the opportunity to speak with the person who last held your position. Sometimes this will not be possible (for example, if the person left on bad terms.) But it will usually reveal some insight into what happened.

What are the hours and benefits? Some companies will expect you to put in a 50-hour work week, so this is important to know upfront. Additionally, you should take into consideration sick days, paid vacation, 401k, health insurance, tuition reimbursement, and other benefits when looking at your compensation. (And if you do accept the offer, don’t forget to take advantage of the benefits you learn about now!)
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Linkedin LogoThe beginning and end to how you land a good job is simple: connections. Whether the company you’re going for is large or small, knowing someone there will give you a leg up on the competition. Even knowing someone who knows someone who knows someone can help a little, which is why sites like LinkedIn are becoming more and more important to finding jobs. Even better, the vast majority of people still don’t even think of using LinkedIn or don’t know how to do it. Read on to see how using it can help you stay ahead of the pack.

It’s a personalized search engine. Because the nature of LinkedIn is such that people post their employment information - past and present - once you join and connect with friends and acquaintances, you can see what companies they have connections to. Could you find the kind of job you want at any of these companies? Because now you’ve got a direct “in.”

Where are people like you? With LinkedIn, you can do an advanced search for people nearby that have the same skill set as you and see where they work. For example, if you’re a Photoshop expert in Cincinnati, Ohio, you can look at people’s profiles in your zip code who also have Photoshop experience and see where they work. You might discover employment opportunities you never knew existed.
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November 7th, 2011 by Linda White   Posted in Interviewing, Job Search, Recruiting & Hiring

They Hire You Because They Like YouAll other things being equal, how do you get a job in a cutthroat, tight job economy like this one? While indeed you do need to have the skills presented in the position description and be able to fulfill the job needs, one of the most basic truths of human behavior is that the more likeable you are, the more likely it is that you will be hired.

So how do you present yourself as likeable? Well, it’s true that it is not something you can fake. The key, though, is simply to be yourself. There is no point in being nervous. Just walk in as if you are meant to be there. Presenting yourself with confidence and without negativity will get you half the way to hearing, “You’re hired.”

Think about what qualities attract you to people. What are your friends like? Are they easy-going, quick to smile, and can they articulate their thoughts well? These are the same qualities that an employer is looking for in a job candidate. Here are a few tips to help smooth your way:

Dress for success - studies show that 45% of employer decisions are based on appearance.

Present yourself well - this includes being prepared, answering questions fully without rambling, and asking good questions. Have at least five questions prepared in advance that you can ask. Answer questions with confidence.
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You know you have what it take to land that dream job, but maybe you need some résumé  Rx. Try following this visual guide for a few tips on creating an eye-catching résumé.

Anatomy of an Outstanding Resume

Anatomy of an Outstanding Resume

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