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Digital Resumes – What Are They, and Who Needs One?
August 9th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler  Posted in Resume Writing

Dynamic LaptopThe next time you update your resume, you may want to consider going online - and not just to look for sample resumes to emulate! Some companies, particularly those in the tech and finance industries, are now requesting digital resumes.

What exactly does that mean? Well, instead of sending them a PDF or Word doc attachment, they want candidates for their positions to send along a link (or links) to their web presence. Even if a position you are applying to doesn’t request  a digital resume, sending one along with your traditional resume can help you stand out from the crowd. That’s never a bad idea, but in this crowded job market it’s practically a necessity. It also has the added advantage of showing that you are web savvy, an important skill in most workplaces today.

So what exactly is a digital resume, and what do employers expect you to include? This is a new format, so there are no set standards like there are for traditional resumes. What one company means by “digital resume” can be very different from another’s idea.

While this may seem overwhelming and confusing at first, it’s actually a wonderful opportunity for you to get creative and highlight your particular strengths.  Here are two of the most popular formats for digital resumes.

LinkedIn

The most basic digital resume is LinkedIn, which is a site that allows you to list your work history, skills, etc., just like you would on a traditional resume. It’s also a social network that allows you to easily connect with people in your field. Many people include the URL for their LinkedIn page on their business cards, providing people with an easy way to discover their work history.

The benefit of a digital resume on LinkedIn is that it doesn’t require any web design, graphic design, or other special skills to put together - but the downside is that it really is not that different from a traditional resume.

Your Own Website

That’s why many people opt to get their own domain name and create a website to host their digital resume. It allows you complete creative freedom over how you share the information you want to get across. This format is most commonly used by people who have a portfolio of work to showcase, but it can be useful to any professional, allowing you to include charts, graphs, links, audio, video and images.

The downside is that you do need some knowledge of web design in order to put one together - or you need to hire a web designer to do it for you. Either way, you want to ensure that the final result looks professional, or it could actually work against you.

Of course, those aren’t the only two options you have available. People have created digital resumes using infographics, Facebook timeline, Google Earth, and more. The idea is to find the best way to capture an employer’s attention and sell them your skills and talents utilizing all the internet has to offer.
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