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Posts Tagged ‘Cover Letter’

November 29th, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Resumark News

Quick Tips to Personalize Your Cover LetterEvery single cover letter should be personalized. If you’ve been out in the world looking for a job for any length of time, you know this. You’ve been told over and over. And it makes sense - if you’re an employer, are you going to give precedence to the cover letter that says something unique and interesting and shows that the jobseeker took their time and cares about getting a job at your company… or the one that reads like a form letter?

Here’s the problem, though: really and truly making each letter personal by rewriting it from the ground up each time to fit the needs of every single job you apply for - that just isn’t feasible for most of us. Nor is it practical. You should be spending your time looking for more jobs rather than agonizing over perfecting a cover letter that - let’s face it - most likely isn’t going to get you hired.

So what’s the answer, then? Too generic and you get ignored. Too specific and personal and you’re likely wasting time. What you need is a middle ground. A way to make each letter feel personal without actually needing to start from scratch each time. Check out the tips below and you’ll be ready to do just that - employers will be beating down your door in no time!

Name the person you’re emailing. I know it’s difficult - and sometimes impossible these days with internet postings that can even withhold the name of the company - but do whatever you can to get the name of the person to whom the email is going. Call the company. Go to their website. When all else fails, don’t do the generic “To Whom It May Concern,” Instead, address your application to the “Hiring Manager”, “College Recruiter”, or “Selection Committee.”
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istock_000005664495xsmallRecently I’ve been helping my son write a cover letter for a prospective internship. He’s in college, and this is the first cover letter he’s ever had to write. Cover letters may seem like a throwaway thing, just somewhere to put the hiring manager’s name, but that could not be further from the truth. Here are a few tips for recent grads, those who have not had to write cover letters for years, or anyone looking for a refresher on this oh-so-important job hunting tool.

Keep it short and pertinent

Keep your cover letter to one page. No matter what. Even if you have the most interesting stories to tell, no one will read past the first page. They are scanning. Only when you grab the hiring manager will they slow down enough to read the actual letter. How to grab them? Start out by telling them you know what they need, and you are that solution. If you know of a new initiative that company is undergoing, state it here. If you think it’s an exciting time to be working for them, tell them so.

Continue in the second paragraph by showing them how your experience fits with what they need. Two short examples from recent experiences. These don’t have to be work experience; they could be volunteer work or school projects or club activities.
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August 31st, 2010 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Most Popular, Resume Writing

ResumeCustomizing your resume and cover letter for each job opportunity can be tedious, particularly if you are applying for dozens of positions a day. You can make things easier for yourself by creating templates.

Making a Resume Template:

1. Start out by getting all your experience down on paper. Don’t worry about page count or specialization, simply include everything you would ever want to list for a position.

2. The next step is to edit the resume, so it is easy to customize. If you are going with a functional resume, this is easy. To customize it for a specific position, you can simply remove the skills you don’t need to highlight until you get it down to one page. For a chronological resume, you can’t simply delete irrelevant experience without creating gaps in your timeline. Instead, format your job descriptions into bullet points instead of paragraphs, and put those points in order of importance. Then if a job doesn’t fit your needs, you can de-emphasize it by trimming their descriptions to just one or two bullet points. If you are listing your skills, group them. For example:
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June 28th, 2010 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Most Popular, Resume Writing

junk-mail-resume-cover-letterThere is currently a big controversy raging about whether or not to include a cover letter when you send in your application for a job. Some recruiters and HR people claim they never look at cover letters. Others say they use a cover letter’s content and overall professionalism to decide which resumes will rise toward the top of the pile.

Since there is no hard and fast rule, it’s up to you to decide how best to stay in the running for a job: with a cover letter that may not be wanted, or without a cover letter that may be what the recruiter or HR person is looking for. Of course, when a cover letter is requested, you have no choice.

When you choose to send a cover letter, you should include it in the body of your email message. You could theoretically attach it to your email as a separate file, or integrate your cover letter material into the first part of your resume. However, most recruiters and HR people say it’s confusing to add a cover letter to your resume and it’s likely to be ignored if a cover letter arrives in a separate file by itself.

However you send it, there are several ways to craft an effective cover letter.

First, start with just a brief statement that you’re fully qualified for the job. Close the letter by expressing your interest in pursuing this job opportunity. As a final step, be sure to polish the cover letter until it’s short, sweet, and direct. In between, you can put three types of cover letter “meat”:
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March 23rd, 2010 by Tatiana Varenik   Posted in Interviewing, Job Search, Networking

Fire the fingerIn today’s economy many people found themselves looking for a job. Some of us who have been successfully employed for years are now going through job interviews again.  And after the interview we often don’t know if we should write a Thank You Letter or not?

We asked LinkedIn professionals a question: “Should job seekers write a Thank You letter?” Here are the responses we’ve got:
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