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Posts Tagged ‘Employment’

August 22nd, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, Resume Writing

How Long Should Your Resume Be?Generally, the answer is: as short as it can be. Some people belong to the school of thought that anything over a page is simply too long. It’s just one resume among a pile of dozens or hundreds more, so you need to make your case fast before they move on to the next one.

But here’s the thing: you also don’t want to leave off key experience because you’re trying to artificially cram everything onto one page. The key is to highlight the relevant experience, skills, education, and attributes, and for some, this may require two pages. In the case of senior executives with a lot of time in the workforce, your resume may even be longer. However, if you’re a recent college graduate or someone with just a few years of work experience, there’s no reason to have a resume over one page.

Some people incorrectly believe that having a longer resume will make them look more qualified or accomplished, but if you don’t actually have the experience, simply making it longer won’t fool anyone. In fact, it will just take them longer to get to the information that is relevant and may end up in you being passed over for the position.

What You Can Cut

So how do you know if your resume is as short as it can be? Look it over to see what’s extraneous. Each section and each item should be a selling point that gives the potential employer evidence that you are the right candidate. Here are a few common places where you may be able to cut down - or remove things altogether.

References

It’s no longer customary to include your references on your resume, so this is a great section to cut. If your employer is interested in contacting people for recommendations, you can provide them on a separate sheet. Similarly, you don’t need to include a line that says, “References available upon request.” The potential employer will assume this is the case.
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February 21st, 2012 by Danielle Kogan   Posted in Job News, On the Radar

Does your career hit the mark?
Via: CollegeOnline.org
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February 15th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, Interviewing

How to Explain Getting Fired To state the obvious, no one likes getting fired. But as uncomfortable as that can be, talking about it in the interview for your next (hopeful) job might be even worse. You don’t want to lie, but you definitely want to make sure you come out sounding good - or at least like you understand what went wrong and have learned from it.

In fact, most people try to avoid talking about it at all, but this can lead to an even bigger problem and far more discomfort if the interviewer discovers that you weren’t being honest with them. So how exactly do you broach the subject?

Don’t blame. Think about the person across the table from you. It’s quite possible that they have had to fire people before, and learning that you were let go from your last job will likely dredge up those memories. Just like no one likes to get fired, no one really enjoys the job of firing someone either. If your explanation of why you got fired is mostly an exercise in blaming the people who fired you, it’s only going to make your interview see you as a difficult person and dread the possibility of having such a conversation with you.

Show that you’ve learned. Rather than blaming, say that it was a good learning experience and detail how it has helped you to grow as a person and an employee. What you say will depend on the job and the reason you were let go, but this is your chance to show that you own your mistakes and take responsibility - two things most employers respect.
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February 7th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in In the Workplace, On the Radar

Job SharingWhile the current job market has made even finding paying work difficult for many people, there are still a number of workers out there who simply have too much to do in their position, often due to responsibilities at home.

One option that’s becoming increasingly available is the process of job sharing. What’s job sharing? Well, it’s pretty much what it sounds like. Instead of one person having to do a job, some people are exploring the process of splitting a single full-time job between two people.

Now, people out of work probably aren’t going to benefit directly from job sharing. When a position is split, it tends to happen between two people already working at the company who both need to cut back on their hours and responsibilities. That being said, job sharing by its nature means that two people who were previously doing two different jobs will now be doing one, which by anyone’s math should tell you that there will be an opening.

So, is job sharing right for you? There are many factors to consider before going to your boss and proposing it.

Do you have a partner in crime? While it’s possible that you could mention the idea to your boss and they’ll either know someone or start looking for you, it would put you in a far better position if you already know someone in the company who’s willing to split your job with you. The other reason to find this person yourself is that they are essentially going to be your new partner. To do the job well, you’re going to have to trust them with everything you know and feel very comfortable with each other.
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November 2nd, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Interviewing, Recruiting & Hiring

4 Simple Tips for Hiring the Right CandidateInterviewing candidates can be a tough proposition. Oftentimes, multiple candidates will appear qualified and seem likable, but how do you know which one will really be the best employee for you? The right person could mean increased productivity, a better working environment, and less stress on you. On the other hand, bringing in the wrong person can become an expensive, time-consuming, headache-inducing mistake.

It’s impossible to truly know 100% who’s going to serve you best, but there are a number of things you can do to lessen the chances of hiring a dud.

Know your needs. When you bring someone in for an interview, you need to make sure you know what the job actually entails. This may seem painfully obvious, but you’d be surprised by how many interviewees complain about not getting an accurate description and overview of responsibilities on the job they’re interviewing for. Before the interview, collect information from others in the department about the duties, skills needed, and general work environment. Use this to craft your job description. Bonus points: having good, clear information in the job description will narrow your pool of applicants so that you’re more likely to be interviewing people who already fit what you need.
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