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Posts Tagged ‘Health’

January 9th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, Employee Rights

Preparing for Maternity Leave While obviously beautiful and exciting, pregnancy also has to be one of the most stressful times in a woman’s life. Your body is changing, you worry about every little thing that has even a minute chance of harming your baby-to-be, you’re constantly going to or coming from appointments, and you have this huge, scary expense looming - on top of all the smaller expenses like maternity clothes and prenatal vitamins that just keep coming.

Bottom line, this is not the time you want to be worrying about the logistics of something like maternity leave. Unfortunately, unless you’re a super planner and looked into all of this ahead of time, that’s exactly what you have to do if you’re a working woman. Luckily, there are some common things you can do to help make the process easier.

Research your rights. While the Family and Medical Leave Act allows many workers 12 weeks of unpaid leave for the care of a newborn child or the adoption or foster care of a child, this law doesn’t apply to anyone who works at a company with fewer than 50 employees. You also have to have worked for your employer for 12 months, for at least 1,250 hours in the last year. The law prevents your company from firing you due to your pregnancy, but that doesn’t protect you from being laid off with other people.

Use resources. Human resources, that is. Among other things, your HR rep can explain to you your company’s maternity leave plan, including how many paid days of leave you have (if any), whether they or the state offer short-term disability (STD) and how and when you should apply, how many vacation, sick, and personal days you have and what the limitations are on how you can use them, and how your maternity leave might affect any other work benefits you get, both while you’re on leave and after you return to the office.
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October 12th, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice

istock_000007055783xsmallMaybe you stayed out late last night. Or you have a new baby at home. Whatever the reason, sometimes you’re just plain sleepy and out of it - but you still have to clock in at work. To avoid letting your drowsiness affect your work performance and others’ perceptions of your effectiveness, you need to focus on remaining alert. Just because you didn’t get a full 8 hours of sleep doesn’t mean you can allow yourself to slack. After all, there are meetings to attend and deadlines to meet.

Many people turn to coffee to help keep them awake, but the truth is it can sometimes hurt as much as it helps. The initial energy boost may make you feel great… for a while, but eventually it wears off and you may crash and feel worse than before. So what options do you have?

Split up your meals. Instead of having a large lunch, try having a 2 or 3 smaller meals throughout the day. Keeping your blood glucose level up can really help improve your energy levels, and by eating smaller portions, you’ll avoid that drowsy feeling you may experience after a large lunch.

Stretch. Boost your energy levels by performing a few simple exercises right at your desk. Stretch your shoulders, your wrist, and your neck. You can get up from your desk to stretch even more muscles, just like you would at the gym. Nap. Studies have found that it can boost productivity, so many offices are very open to the idea. Even if your workplace isn’t, you can search for a quiet place to close your eyes for ten minutes or even head out to your car.
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September 15th, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in In the Workplace

istock_000004028743xsmallDo you suffer from frequent neck and back pain? It may be because your desk space isn’t set up properly. Or it could be your posture. Likely, it’s a little bit of both, so make use of some office ergonomics to fix it!

Use arm rests. They help to reduce the stress put on your wrist and finger joints.

Adjust the height of your chair. Your hips should be between 90 and 120 degrees, and your feet should rest completely on the floor. Can’t accomplish both things with your chair? Get a foot rest.

Get lumbar support. It should be located slightly below the waist line. If your chair doesn’t provide support in that area, ask management for a new one or swap with another chair in the office.

Use a high back chair. When scoping out for a new chair, find one that provides support for your shoulder blades as well if possible.
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July 7th, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, In the Workplace

istock_000015215413xsmallWhen you’re headed into the office for another day behind your desk, emergency preparedness is probably the last thing on your mind. Unfortunately, disasters can strike at any time, and you always need to be ready. Places of business are required to have some emergency procedures in place - an evacuation plan, a first aid kit - but there are many ways to be prepared that companies ignore… and things you can do for yourself at work to make sure you’re ready.



Red Cross training courses.

If your company doesn’t already have a program set up for you to learn first aid/CPR/AED, talk to your HR representative about setting one up. Your local chapter of the Red Cross should have a wealth of options for different programs and training courses like the Red Cross Ready Rating Program, which is free to businesses, schools, and organizations!
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June 24th, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, In the Workplace

Business team showing thumbs upEveryone says that the job market is getting better - slowly - but it’s still an incredibly tough market out there, and you want to do whatever you can to show the boss that you’re the right person for the job. You’ll work harder, faster, smarter - whatever it takes. Which is why we’re offering you some tips on improving productivity. Start using a few of these, and you won’t be worried about keeping your job - you’ll be worried about how much to ask for in your promotion!

1. Nap.

Weren’t expecting that one, were you? But multiple studies have shown that taking a short 20 minute nap after lunch can improve your creativity, mood, and focus - your productivity - by as much at 34%!

2. Delegate.

That’s right, give your work to someone else - the parts that don’t absolutely have to be done by you, that is. It may seem like a lazy move, but not if you’re doing it for genuine reasons. Take the time you save delegating your smaller, less significant tasks and use it to take on a bigger job you haven’t had time for. Or polish up a presentation that’s gotten the short shrift because of all the little daily tasks you’ve had to do. Even better, delegation can show your boss that you’re a good leader and know how to use other people as resources. Often when one person is swamped, others don’t have enough to do. So lighten your load and show that you’re paying attention to the resources around you.
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