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Posts Tagged ‘Hiring’


You know you have what it take to land that dream job, but maybe you need some résumé  Rx. Try following this visual guide for a few tips on creating an eye-catching résumé.

Anatomy of an Outstanding Resume

Anatomy of an Outstanding Resume

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September 26th, 2011 by Danielle Kogan   Posted in Job News, Networking

obama-linkedin_6161In an effort to promote American Jobs Act introduced earlier this month at a joint session of Congress, President Obama has teamed up with social networking site, LinkedIn for a town hall about creating jobs and growing the economy.

The discussion is moderated by LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner, and features President Obama in a Q&A session with a small audience addressing topics including American Jobs Act, reducing the deficit, creating permanent jobs and other economic issues.



To get involved you can follow the discussion or join and even ask the President a question.
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Business cardIt doesn’t happen often, but recruiters do go looking for good candidates to fill desirable jobs. That’s why you should take some time to make yourself as easy to find as you possibly can.

It’s true that the best recruiters already have a large network of candidates for the kinds of jobs they are most often asked to fill. But because recruiters assiduously fill these jobs, they regularly need to replenish their pool of qualified candidates. So they go looking. And if you’re very well qualified, you have a chance not only to be found, but to leapfrog over other candidates who have been in a recruiter’s rolodex for years.

Here are some simple and inexpensive ways you can hoist a flag to make yourself more noticeable (on LinkedIn) to the kinds of people who can help you get hired:

Go Bigger

Your LinkedIn profile is a fundamental building block of both credibility and visibility. That’s why it’s valuable to take the time to open a LinkedIn account, and then to flesh out your profile with details about your skills, background, and experience.

LinkedIn is a good place to start making yourself better known because it is one of the online directories that top recruiters have come to trust. Studies show that recruiters and hiring managers visit LinkedIn and rely on the candidate information they find there in far larger numbers than they use Facebook or Twitter.
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istock_000005549186xsmall2Most of the time you devote toward finding open positions and applying for them involves checking, improving, and highlighting how well you match the skills, knowledge, experience, and other requirements of the position. That’s all well and good. But there’s an entirely separate set of characteristics employers also insist upon in top candidates: your values.

While values themselves won’t get you hired, any shortage of certain values will tend to keep you unemployed. In addition to the values we covered last time (responsibility, dependability, willingness to work and to work smart), there are several others you should try to highlight for potential employers, including:

Positivity

It’s the old “glass half full or half empty” consideration: almost without regard to the situation, it’s possible to see it from a positive point of view, or a negative one. Sometimes the negative assessment is appropriate. But no one likes negativity. So when a candidate shows a tendency to focus on the positive aspects of events and situations, employers normally take notice and nod appreciatively.
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istock_000015844150xsmallLeaping the chasm between unemployment and a good job requires that you perform well in one or more job interviews. Unfortunately, most job interviews are inherently unfair: they occur at arbitrary times, they normally generate significant emotional pressure, and they’re littered with interview land-mines — you know them as “questions” — that are difficult or impossible to navigate.

But over the years, human resources experts have identified the most dangerous of these land mines and developed some useful guidelines for handling them with aplomb.

Here is the essence of many experts’ advice on how to answer some of the most difficult interview questions:



Tough question 1: How well do you take criticism about your work?

Good answer: The obvious answer is “I’m open to receiving criticism, and to making changes based on honest feedback.” But that’s not enough. The hidden agenda in this question is to probe your personality and your attitude toward work. Are you arrogant? Do you believe you’re smarter than your coworkers? Are you comfortable admitting mistakes? To answer effectively and helpfully, you must respond to those considerations, too, something along the lines of: “I enjoy learning from others and getting their ideas on things. I’ve found that collective intelligence is much better at solving problems than any one person. So hearing about my mistakes or missed opportunities, and listening to others is a great way to improve performance, and to learn.”


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