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Posts Tagged ‘Interview Questions’

August 19th, 2011 by Linda White   Posted in Career Advice, Interviewing, Job Search, Unemployment

Bussiness people made a deal!

Management Questions

These can be some of the toughest questions. In my experience, you are either going to be interviewing with someone who doesn’t your job at all (like an administrator or HR person), or someone who knows exactly what they want done and what they are looking for (like a VP or higher). So the first rule: never assume. Don’t assume you have all the answers. You are better off fishing around - you can even come right out and ask questions about what they are looking for. That way you will know what to concentrate on from your many years of experience.

Keep in mind that with several of these questions, when the question is about someone else, the interviewer is looking for your reaction and your handling of the situation. Perhaps the most important elements that an interviewer wants to see in a management candidate is - the ability to manage. That means the ability to make decisions and the ability to act under pressure. You’d be surprised how many people shy away from making decisions. And of course, we’ve all seen those who could not or would not manage a stressful situation.
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istock_000016006993xsmallLeaping the chasm between unemployment and a good job requires that you perform well in one or more job interviews. Unfortunately, most job interviews are inherently unfair: they occur at arbitrary times, they normally generate significant emotional pressure, and they’re littered with interview land-mines — you know them as “questions” — that are difficult or impossible to navigate.



Fortunately, experts have well-tested ideas on how you can answer these tough questions with aplomb.

Last time, we covered effective and helpful ways to respond to five very tough questions. This time, we’ll cover good answers for another five:

Tough question 1: Why are you a better fit for this position than other applicants?

Good answer: As an organizational outsider, you’re not in a position to give a meaningful answer to such a question. So don’t even try. Instead, use this question as an opportunity to cite your past successes and qualifications, and to showcase your level of self-confidence. You’ll make a better impression if you can do all this while talking about the company’s growth opportunities, and weaving an essential role for yourself into that scenario.


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istock_000015844150xsmallLeaping the chasm between unemployment and a good job requires that you perform well in one or more job interviews. Unfortunately, most job interviews are inherently unfair: they occur at arbitrary times, they normally generate significant emotional pressure, and they’re littered with interview land-mines — you know them as “questions” — that are difficult or impossible to navigate.

But over the years, human resources experts have identified the most dangerous of these land mines and developed some useful guidelines for handling them with aplomb.

Here is the essence of many experts’ advice on how to answer some of the most difficult interview questions:



Tough question 1: How well do you take criticism about your work?

Good answer: The obvious answer is “I’m open to receiving criticism, and to making changes based on honest feedback.” But that’s not enough. The hidden agenda in this question is to probe your personality and your attitude toward work. Are you arrogant? Do you believe you’re smarter than your coworkers? Are you comfortable admitting mistakes? To answer effectively and helpfully, you must respond to those considerations, too, something along the lines of: “I enjoy learning from others and getting their ideas on things. I’ve found that collective intelligence is much better at solving problems than any one person. So hearing about my mistakes or missed opportunities, and listening to others is a great way to improve performance, and to learn.”


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May 19th, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Interviewing, Networking

Frau unterschreibt einen Vertrag in einem BüroSo you’ve set up a sit-down with someone at the company (or in the profession) that you’d like to work. This is great news! While not a traditional interview, informational meetings can be a great way to make an impression on someone who can help you get the job you want - but only if you know what you’re doing. Informational meetings are tough, because they lack the structure of a formal interview. The best way to describe them is that they’re half networking and half first date. Likely the person you’re meeting with is a friend of a friend or has some other tenuous social connection to you, which means you have tow the line between casual and professional.
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May 2nd, 2011 by Linda White   Posted in Career Advice, Interviewing, Networking

istock_000012124178xsmallMy last article explained what an informational interview is and how to get them. This time, we are going to talk nuts and bolts - what questions you can ask to get that information. The basic difference between this interview and a regular interview - and the benefit - is that you are the one asking the questions. So for this part of the series, we’ll leave the answers to the pros.

Once your person agrees to the interview, you must do your research. Learn everything you can about this company and the type of position that the person you are meeting with does. Think about how that applies to your career goals. But don’t jump ahead of yourself. There is nothing more annoying than a newbie trying to become the chairman of the board. If they suggest you meet with someone else in their company, don’t be offended. Just follow up and make that appointments, using the name of the first person you talked to.
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