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Posts Tagged ‘Job Interview’

June 12th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Interviewing, Job Search

Make The Best Impression In Your Next Interview – Part 2 Given how monumentally difficult it is to judge a person’s ability to perform in a difficult assignment, based on just one or more short interviews, it’s counter-productive for candidates to go into a job interview nervous, worried about what kinds of questions you’ll be asked, or focused on trying to anticipate the skill sets, knowledge, experience, and personality the interviewer is looking for. Last time, we covered replacing anticipation with confidence, and excitement with leadership. Here are two more ideas to help you do better in job interviews by “reframing” the experience as a date:

Instead of thinking of an interview as an ordeal, it’s much better think of it as a date. This way, you’ll have a far easier time making a great impression and getting the interviewer to want to see you again.

(Caveat: Gals might “get” more of this date-oriented advice by translating these ideas into other situations: perhaps making a good impression on an important customer, helping your guests feel welcome at a dinner party, or leading a group that’s discussing a local hot-button issue. Find common ground and you’ll more easily find ways to accept and utilize these ideas.)


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February 15th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, Interviewing

How to Explain Getting Fired To state the obvious, no one likes getting fired. But as uncomfortable as that can be, talking about it in the interview for your next (hopeful) job might be even worse. You don’t want to lie, but you definitely want to make sure you come out sounding good - or at least like you understand what went wrong and have learned from it.

In fact, most people try to avoid talking about it at all, but this can lead to an even bigger problem and far more discomfort if the interviewer discovers that you weren’t being honest with them. So how exactly do you broach the subject?

Don’t blame. Think about the person across the table from you. It’s quite possible that they have had to fire people before, and learning that you were let go from your last job will likely dredge up those memories. Just like no one likes to get fired, no one really enjoys the job of firing someone either. If your explanation of why you got fired is mostly an exercise in blaming the people who fired you, it’s only going to make your interview see you as a difficult person and dread the possibility of having such a conversation with you.

Show that you’ve learned. Rather than blaming, say that it was a good learning experience and detail how it has helped you to grow as a person and an employee. What you say will depend on the job and the reason you were let go, but this is your chance to show that you own your mistakes and take responsibility - two things most employers respect.
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November 29th, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Resumark News

Quick Tips to Personalize Your Cover LetterEvery single cover letter should be personalized. If you’ve been out in the world looking for a job for any length of time, you know this. You’ve been told over and over. And it makes sense - if you’re an employer, are you going to give precedence to the cover letter that says something unique and interesting and shows that the jobseeker took their time and cares about getting a job at your company… or the one that reads like a form letter?

Here’s the problem, though: really and truly making each letter personal by rewriting it from the ground up each time to fit the needs of every single job you apply for - that just isn’t feasible for most of us. Nor is it practical. You should be spending your time looking for more jobs rather than agonizing over perfecting a cover letter that - let’s face it - most likely isn’t going to get you hired.

So what’s the answer, then? Too generic and you get ignored. Too specific and personal and you’re likely wasting time. What you need is a middle ground. A way to make each letter feel personal without actually needing to start from scratch each time. Check out the tips below and you’ll be ready to do just that - employers will be beating down your door in no time!

Name the person you’re emailing. I know it’s difficult - and sometimes impossible these days with internet postings that can even withhold the name of the company - but do whatever you can to get the name of the person to whom the email is going. Call the company. Go to their website. When all else fails, don’t do the generic “To Whom It May Concern,” Instead, address your application to the “Hiring Manager”, “College Recruiter”, or “Selection Committee.”
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November 7th, 2011 by Linda White   Posted in Interviewing, Job Search, Recruiting & Hiring

They Hire You Because They Like YouAll other things being equal, how do you get a job in a cutthroat, tight job economy like this one? While indeed you do need to have the skills presented in the position description and be able to fulfill the job needs, one of the most basic truths of human behavior is that the more likeable you are, the more likely it is that you will be hired.

So how do you present yourself as likeable? Well, it’s true that it is not something you can fake. The key, though, is simply to be yourself. There is no point in being nervous. Just walk in as if you are meant to be there. Presenting yourself with confidence and without negativity will get you half the way to hearing, “You’re hired.”

Think about what qualities attract you to people. What are your friends like? Are they easy-going, quick to smile, and can they articulate their thoughts well? These are the same qualities that an employer is looking for in a job candidate. Here are a few tips to help smooth your way:

Dress for success - studies show that 45% of employer decisions are based on appearance.

Present yourself well - this includes being prepared, answering questions fully without rambling, and asking good questions. Have at least five questions prepared in advance that you can ask. Answer questions with confidence.
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You know you have what it take to land that dream job, but maybe you need some résumé  Rx. Try following this visual guide for a few tips on creating an eye-catching résumé.

Anatomy of an Outstanding Resume

Anatomy of an Outstanding Resume

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