Resumark Blog

» Blog Home
Search
Post Resume
Post Resume
Free Resume Search
Free Resume Search
Post Jobs for Free
Post Jobs for Free
Job 2.0 Network
Job 2.0 Network










Posts Tagged ‘Job Trending’

August 9th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Resume Writing

Dynamic LaptopThe next time you update your resume, you may want to consider going online - and not just to look for sample resumes to emulate! Some companies, particularly those in the tech and finance industries, are now requesting digital resumes.

What exactly does that mean? Well, instead of sending them a PDF or Word doc attachment, they want candidates for their positions to send along a link (or links) to their web presence. Even if a position you are applying to doesn’t request  a digital resume, sending one along with your traditional resume can help you stand out from the crowd. That’s never a bad idea, but in this crowded job market it’s practically a necessity. It also has the added advantage of showing that you are web savvy, an important skill in most workplaces today.

So what exactly is a digital resume, and what do employers expect you to include? This is a new format, so there are no set standards like there are for traditional resumes. What one company means by “digital resume” can be very different from another’s idea.

While this may seem overwhelming and confusing at first, it’s actually a wonderful opportunity for you to get creative and highlight your particular strengths.  Here are two of the most popular formats for digital resumes.

LinkedIn

The most basic digital resume is LinkedIn, which is a site that allows you to list your work history, skills, etc., just like you would on a traditional resume. It’s also a social network that allows you to easily connect with people in your field. Many people include the URL for their LinkedIn page on their business cards, providing people with an easy way to discover their work history.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

July 10th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, On the Radar

How to Enjoy the Job You Currently HaveAs Americans, we’re taught to shoot for the stars. To always be looking towards the horizon for that next big thing, and never be complacent. In many ways, this is great advice. It keeps us fighting to better ourselves, get promotions, and achieve our dreams.

Unfortunately, it can also lead to us feeling unsatisfied and unable to enjoy where we are because we’re always looking to the future for happiness. Sometimes, these dissatisfied feelings can bleed into our work performance, and in the current employment climate, that is a very bad thing. With that in mind, here are a few ways for you to take a step back and realize that there are a lot of things you like about your current job, even if it’s not your dream position.

Think about the money. Chances are, you probably wish that you were making more. Fair enough. But if you asked him, even someone like Donald Trump would probably say he wished he was making more money. We don’t stop dreaming for more, but that doesn’t mean you can’t be thankful of what you have - a steady paycheck coming in that allows you to cover your expenses and keep dreaming.

Relish the security and stability. If you’re a person thinking about striking out on your own as a freelancer or with a small business, think about all the worries and stresses that come with that. It’s not just money that may fluctuate from week to week, but the ability of this new career or business to work out at all. Most likely, your current job is relatively stable and secure, even if it doesn’t seem to be leading anywhere.

Enjoy friendships and relationships. Even if you don’t like your job or your boss, most likely there are people you work with that you consider friends. If the work itself is beating you down, concentrate on these relationships. You might end up finding ways to help each other and make work (and life) more bearable.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

June 4th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in In the Workplace

7 Tips for Making the Most of Business TripsBusiness or pleasure? Maybe you don’t have to choose. Depending on how you handle them, business trips can be stressful, exhausting, and frustrating – or fun, relaxing, and productive. Where most people go wrong is in making their business trip all about, well, business.

Obviously if your company is sending you on a business trip, there is work that needs to be accomplished, but that doesn’t mean every waking minute has to be spent doing work. And if you plan well and talk to your company ahead of time, it won’t have to be.

Take someone. If the trip is just a few days, see if your spouse or significant other wants to join you for a quick little getaway. Make sure they understand that you will be working, but set aside downtime to go out – or stay in – together. For longer trips, you can even take the family. And if your company is amenable…

Extend the trip. It’s going to be difficult to get away from the office while you’re travelling for work… but not if you’re not going to work. See if your company will let you add a few days on to the end of the trip and take a later flight back. Some companies will be happy to do this as long as you aren’t needed back in the home office; others will make you pick up the cost of the return flight. Either way, you’ll have save money on the flight there and several days at the hotel.

Learn the area. Before you catch your flight, do a bit of research on where you’re going and pick a few places you want to check out in the area. Does it have great nightlife? Tourist attractions? Having a game plan will help enormously if you’re splitting what little time you have between work and play.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

May 31st, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in In the Workplace, Job News

Things That Affect Your Productivity – Part 1: PsychologyMost people know that their environment can affect the way that they work, but often we don’t put a whole lot of thought into the different things that help or hurt us, and what we can do about them.

Researchers that study the way we work best as human beings have laid out three different types of environmental factors that impact our ability to get things done when we need to. These are psychological, territorial, and physical. In this post, I’m going to focus on the way our own psychology affects our productivity levels.

Psychology Equals Focus

That may be breaking it down a bit too simply, but in large part, it’s true. When we can focus or get “in the zone,” our productivity goes way up, and often even the quality of the work itself improves. People who are truly and intensely focused can even lose track of time because they’re so into what they’re doing.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

April 24th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Job Search, Networking

Can Blogging Help Your Job Search?You’ve likely heard about companies firing their employers for complaining about their jobs (or sometimes even just mentioning them) in their personal blogs. What you don’t hear as much about are the success stories. People who attract the attention of employers through their blogging.

Why would blogging make employers think that you’re the person for them? Maintaining a blog requires a certain kind of skillset and can translate into a number of workplace environments.

You have to know how to market… Obviously great for marketing positions, but really in any industry where you might be creating a presentation about something for your bosses (or their bosses), this is a great skill to have.

…and network. The way to get more hits on your blog is that same way you get ahead in the business world: network with the right people who are able and willing to lend a helping hand in exchange for you doing the same.

You have to be able to build and maintain relationships. In other words - people skills. Sure, you’re dealing with your readers virtually, but a lot of the same manners and protocols apply that do in the work place. Good people skills are always a sought-after skill.

You have to be able to clearly communicate. This applies to, oh, just about every job anywhere. Unless you’re working completely alone, you’ll need to talk to coworkers, delegate effectively to people below you, and explain to your superiors why you did or didn’t do what they asked of you. People who communicate well tend to do well.
Read this »
  • Share/Bookmark

Share
 

« Older Entries
« Previous
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9