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Posts Tagged ‘Online Job Search’

April 24th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Job Search, Networking

Can Blogging Help Your Job Search?You’ve likely heard about companies firing their employers for complaining about their jobs (or sometimes even just mentioning them) in their personal blogs. What you don’t hear as much about are the success stories. People who attract the attention of employers through their blogging.

Why would blogging make employers think that you’re the person for them? Maintaining a blog requires a certain kind of skillset and can translate into a number of workplace environments.

You have to know how to market… Obviously great for marketing positions, but really in any industry where you might be creating a presentation about something for your bosses (or their bosses), this is a great skill to have.

…and network. The way to get more hits on your blog is that same way you get ahead in the business world: network with the right people who are able and willing to lend a helping hand in exchange for you doing the same.

You have to be able to build and maintain relationships. In other words - people skills. Sure, you’re dealing with your readers virtually, but a lot of the same manners and protocols apply that do in the work place. Good people skills are always a sought-after skill.

You have to be able to clearly communicate. This applies to, oh, just about every job anywhere. Unless you’re working completely alone, you’ll need to talk to coworkers, delegate effectively to people below you, and explain to your superiors why you did or didn’t do what they asked of you. People who communicate well tend to do well.
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April 20th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Job Search, Recruiting & Hiring, Resume Writing

Use Twitter for Job HuntingThe advice is well known: as soon as you’re back on the streets, looking for work, you:
  • Update your resume
  • Tweak your LinkedIn profile
  • Browse the job boards
  • Apply to every open position that makes sense
  • Tell family, friends and professional colleagues that you’re looking
But there’s more you can do: Although Twitter is best known for silly, superficial, in-the-moment communications among people who know each other personally, it’s increasingly coming into use as a networking medium among people who have never met.

With Twitter accumulating active, involved users at a breath-taking pace, there are starting to be ways to use this communications channel for job hunting - ways that didn’t exist just a short time ago.

These include:

1) Tweet your needs to your friends and followers. It’s smart to use Twitter to let everyone in your network know you’re back in the hunt for a good position. Not only may you reach people not included in LinkedIn, Facebook, and your other networks, people who tweet are often an active, plugged-in group. In many cases, your contacts on Twitter will quickly offer you strong leads, or at least useful contacts, you can pursue as you search for your next job.
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March 8th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice, Interviewing, Job Search

Find Out More about Prospective Employers“We’d like to offer you a position.”

Those are great words to hear, particularly if - like many jobseekers - you’ve been looking for work longer than you’ve ever had to look before.

But while the urge to say “Yes” will undoubtedly be strong the next time you hear those words, you shouldn’t accept without knowing a good deal about your prospective employer. You can, of course, wait to do all this research until after you’ve been offered a job. But there are at least two good reasons not to wait:

1. Some of the information you dig up will help you look good to a hiring manager.

2. Some of it will also help you decide whether, and how, to best pursue a job with this employer.

Regardless of when you want to dig up each tidbit of information, here’s a rundown of what you probably want to know about a prospective employer, and where to find it:

Obviously, you’ll want to know the basics:

-Locations

-Main business activities

-Products and services

You can find most of this just by looking in the yellow pages.

But you’ll also want to know much more.

Competitiveness For example, how does your prospective employer (PE) stack up against the competition? To find out, visit your PE’s website and familiarize yourself with the branding and marketing information displayed there. Take a look at your PE’s pricing structure, guarantees or warranties, and how it positions itself. Depending on what your PE sells, you may also want to approach the company as a customer would, and try to get a perspective on how the company is seen by those who spend money to keep it going.

Then briefly do the same for your PE’s major competitors. After you’ve done this round of research, carefully consider which company in your PE’s industry or market niche is doing the best job.
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Linkedin LogoThe beginning and end to how you land a good job is simple: connections. Whether the company you’re going for is large or small, knowing someone there will give you a leg up on the competition. Even knowing someone who knows someone who knows someone can help a little, which is why sites like LinkedIn are becoming more and more important to finding jobs. Even better, the vast majority of people still don’t even think of using LinkedIn or don’t know how to do it. Read on to see how using it can help you stay ahead of the pack.

It’s a personalized search engine. Because the nature of LinkedIn is such that people post their employment information - past and present - once you join and connect with friends and acquaintances, you can see what companies they have connections to. Could you find the kind of job you want at any of these companies? Because now you’ve got a direct “in.”

Where are people like you? With LinkedIn, you can do an advanced search for people nearby that have the same skill set as you and see where they work. For example, if you’re a Photoshop expert in Cincinnati, Ohio, you can look at people’s profiles in your zip code who also have Photoshop experience and see where they work. You might discover employment opportunities you never knew existed.
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January 4th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in On the Radar, Unemployment

GigwalkPicture this: you go out with friends, using a new app you downloaded on your smartphone to find a restaurant to grab dinner and drinks. You whip out your smartphone and take a picture of the restaurant’s menu as you leave, then stop off at the electronics store on the way home and take a picture of an advertisement for a particular cell phone.

This may not sound like a job, but if you were using Gigwalk, you could have just made about $40-50. How? Those pictures you took were jobs or “gigs” that companies posted on Gigwalk. “Snap a picture of my competition’s menu.” “Find out if Tim’s Electronics Store is really advertising our phone the way they said they would.” And the app used to find the restaurant? Why, you were getting paid to test it out.

Gigwalk works by using the GPS locations and home addresses of smartphone users so that they are shown gigs in their area. After you accept a gig, you’re typically given a couple of days to finish it. When you do, you submit it for approval and then get paid through PayPal. Do a good job completing your tasks and you’ll have a better chance next time at landing one of the better-paying gigs.
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