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Posts Tagged ‘Recession’

February 20th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice

How to Hang On to Your Current Job Part 2With the outlook for employment growth so bleak, many forward-looking employees - particularly some of the older ones - are realizing that the best way to avoid a long and unsettling period of job-hunting is to take some immediate steps to hang on to your current position.

Last time, we covered the idea of providing innovations that make you more valuable, and staying up-to-date within your field. Here are some additional techniques for making sure the decision-makers above you recognize your unique and irreplaceable contributions to the organization’s success:

Identify and emphasize the connections between your work and your organization’s success.

For example, if you’re in sales then your contribution is to bring in business. If you’re in manufacturing, your contribution is to produce items for sale. In other positions, the connections may be less obvious. Whatever you do, take the time and effort to understand in detail how your work fits into the organization’s overall activity and - this is important - how it impacts whatever metrics your supervisor and other managers value the most.

The more vividly you can make clear the connection between what you do and your organization’s success, the more likely you are to be appreciated and honored for your daily contributions.

Stretch out your time horizon. Look around within your organization for changes that will take a relatively long time to complete - moving to a new location, reconfiguring the flow of work, introducing a new product or service, and the like. Think about changes currently underway, of course, but also look farther out for changes likely to happen in the future. Then take steps to involve yourself in these changes.
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September 26th, 2011 by Danielle Kogan   Posted in Job News, Networking

obama-linkedin_6161In an effort to promote American Jobs Act introduced earlier this month at a joint session of Congress, President Obama has teamed up with social networking site, LinkedIn for a town hall about creating jobs and growing the economy.

The discussion is moderated by LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner, and features President Obama in a Q&A session with a small audience addressing topics including American Jobs Act, reducing the deficit, creating permanent jobs and other economic issues.



To get involved you can follow the discussion or join and even ask the President a question.
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September 12th, 2011 by Linda White   Posted in Career Advice, Job Search

istock_000009050303xsmallIt’s a true adage that the grass is always greener. This can be especially true in the job market, not only with particular jobs but with the type of worker you could be. I am sure that many people working corporate jobs hold some amount of envy or even resentment for those freelancers or consultants they work with, who can just breeze in for a meeting and then be on their way. And… there are many of those freelancers who look at their corporate counterparts and think they’ve got it made, what with their steady paychecks, paid trips to industry conferences and paid vacation days (not to mention other benefits).

But what really is the situation? In light of the recent dismal job numbers, it’s something that many people are going to have to consider, and consider hard. It’s best to go into the decision of whether or not to branch out on your own with realistic information, rather than with a rosy glow of expectations that can only set you up for disappointment at best, or failure at worst.
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job-seeker-dispairSurprised that there is no response to the hundreds of resumes you sent out recently? Guess what, some companies are ignoring all applicants who are currently unemployed.

A job posting on a recruiting website advertises an open position for an electronics company with all the usual qualifications, but fine print at the bottom says, “Will not consider anyone NOT currently employed.” Even though just a few job ads have this type of statements, there are reports of human resources representatives confirming this to be their company’s recruitment policies.

“We try to minimize the amount of time we spent on selection of candidates and typically go after people who are happy where they are and tell them about new opportunities”, one of the HR representatives said. According to the recent information from the Labor Department, there are about 5 1/2 applicants for every open position.

Recently a large electronics manufacturer also posted an ad for a marketing position stating that “No unemployed candidates will be considered.” Later they called it a mistake and removed the notice. This type of job ads are easy to find online, they may say e.g. “must be currently employed.”
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May 11th, 2010 by Guest Author   Posted in Career Advice, Unemployment

job-seeker-dispairWhatever you hear in the news lately about the economy – that the market is (maybe) turning around, or that temporary hires are on the rise – cannot change the way you feel if you are currently looking for a job and having a tough time doing it. Thousands of well-qualified people may be unemployed right now, but constantly reminding yourself of all the negatives – that there are so many people searching, that employers can be so much pickier when selecting a candidate – will not get you a new job any faster. Letting yourself get discouraged, or worse, giving up on your search altogether, are the least beneficial things you can do for yourself. Here are a few tips to better your odds and to keep yourself optimistic during this difficult and frustrating time.

1. Seek out support.

Do not be afraid to consult as wide a variety of people as possible about your job search and corresponding woes. Friends and family are a great place to  start, but at this point in history, when so many others are having the same difficulties you are having, seeking help and advice from those outside your normal, close-knit circle can be a positive step as well. Try going to a head hunter or placement agency if you never have before, or a job counseling service, if you can afford to, and consider it an investment in your future. If your budget is too tight to pay a professional for their expertise (as it is for many who have been unemployed for several months or more), try a free support group or other helpful services,  such as government services. Whoever you decide to turn to during this time of transition, having individuals you can turn to and trust with your hopes, worries, and search-related questions will make the process less stressful.


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