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Posts Tagged ‘Recommendations’

May 18th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice, Job Search, Networking

Getting Back Into Your Field: Re-entering the Workforce and/or Your Previous CareerIn today’s job market, any candidate who has been temporarily out of work (whether for child-rearing, lay off, or any other reason) or who has been working on a different career track for the past few years faces tougher-than-normal scrutiny when looking for work along their previous career path. With so many highly-qualified applicants for every decent job, hiring managers simply don’t want to take the time or trouble to consider anyone whose career history is even slightly off-target from the position they’re seeking to fill.

However, if you use the right strategies, you can usually make this situation work out well. Here are some ways to earn the best chance of being hired for a job that’s not directly in line with your recent career trajectory:

1. Ask your personal contacts, your friends and your family about possible connections that can lead you toward the career specialization, industry, or companies you’re aiming for. When you simply apply to publicly advertised jobs, you’re competing with people who have the straight-line, uninterrupted career path you lack. But when you find out about a position through personal contacts, you have a leg up on most of the other candidates, and your lack of recent career-specific background may cease to be a problem.

2.Prepare your case for overall career relevance. Think long and hard about your off-target history, and develop solid reasons why those recent activities - either the work and goals you have been accomplishing, or the non-work activities you have been pursuing - have a lot of relevance and carry-over to whatever position you’re now hoping to obtain. Put together a simple, clear, compelling story that explains why your off-target background makes you a better candidate than before.
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July 5th, 2011 by Linda White   Posted in Career Advice, Job Search, Networking

istock_000008363296xsmallLinkedIn is a great way to professionally network, but like any social media profile, it’s only as good as your contact list. So how do you build up your contact list? Who is it appropriate to connect to on LinkedIn?

Following are a few ideas for where to look to find those oh-so-important contacts.

Former workplaces

Even if you did not work directly with someone, they may remember you. Think of every where that you have worked, and the people you knew there. Once you get going with this, the nice algorithm will continue to give you new people. If you recognize the name, send them an invite to connect. Be sure to include a personal note.
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May 24th, 2011 by Linda White   Posted in Career Advice, Networking, Recruiting & Hiring

Senior Lady Enjoys ComputerIf you are over the age of 40, face it, you are an “older worker.” And the flood of college graduates will not stop. So figuring out what to do to make yourself stand out, how to use your previous experience to your best advantage, and how to leverage all those years behind you is very important.

You might consider some of the basic tips in my last article. It’s a good place to start. But here are a few more that will specifically help the older worker.
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March 23rd, 2011 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Interviewing

Ace Every Type Of InterviewIf you think deeply enough about interviewing, you’ll realize that it’s mostly a relationship — although often a short-lived one — in which the other side calls the tune, and expects you to dance to it.

But the specifics of the tune depend to a great extent on the kind of interview you’re involved with, and that largely depends on the personality of the interviewer. That’s why candidates with good people skills often score much higher in their interviews than people who may be more qualified, but who don’t relate so well to strangers.

Fortunately, the vast majority of interviewers fit into one of several types. If you pay attention during the first few minutes of an interview, you can usually categorize your interviewer, and on that basis shift into the proper relationship mode to do very well in the type of interview that’s likely to follow.

Here’s a rundown of the basic types of interviewers and interviews you’re likely to encounter:
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March 4th, 2011 by Linda White   Posted in Resume Writing

What an Employer Wants to See in Your ResumeA resume is your introduction to your potential employer. Don’t be careless or lazy with this – it is every bit as important as a first impression. In fact, it is your first impression. Here are a few things to consider when putting together your resume.

First of all, don’t title your document Resume. Gee, really? Because that makes it really hard for them to locate your document. It doesn’t pay to be totally generic. Try something with your last name – that way, when the HR person or hiring manager is trying to find your resume in their folder or system, they can easily spot it. So: LWhite.doc. Or LWhiteWriter.doc. Never: Resumev2.docx.

As far as file type, for now, try to avoid the docx file format when sending a file. Not everyone has upgraded and they certainly are not going to come back to you to ask if you can save it down. So if you must attach a file, save it down first if you are using Windows 7.

Think like a recruiter. What’s your bottom line? The skills you need, the job that needs to get done. How easy are those to spot on your resume? Use a format that calls out your specialized skills at the very top. Don’t make that recruiter hunt for them. A “Summary” section at the top is not a totally bad idea. But don’t use “Career Objective” – oh my, that went out with the 80s. Clearly, you are there to get a job that uses your skills and experience.
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