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Posts Tagged ‘Recruiting’

November 2nd, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Interviewing, Recruiting & Hiring

4 Simple Tips for Hiring the Right CandidateInterviewing candidates can be a tough proposition. Oftentimes, multiple candidates will appear qualified and seem likable, but how do you know which one will really be the best employee for you? The right person could mean increased productivity, a better working environment, and less stress on you. On the other hand, bringing in the wrong person can become an expensive, time-consuming, headache-inducing mistake.

It’s impossible to truly know 100% who’s going to serve you best, but there are a number of things you can do to lessen the chances of hiring a dud.

Know your needs. When you bring someone in for an interview, you need to make sure you know what the job actually entails. This may seem painfully obvious, but you’d be surprised by how many interviewees complain about not getting an accurate description and overview of responsibilities on the job they’re interviewing for. Before the interview, collect information from others in the department about the duties, skills needed, and general work environment. Use this to craft your job description. Bonus points: having good, clear information in the job description will narrow your pool of applicants so that you’re more likely to be interviewing people who already fit what you need.
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istock_000005664495xsmallRecently I’ve been helping my son write a cover letter for a prospective internship. He’s in college, and this is the first cover letter he’s ever had to write. Cover letters may seem like a throwaway thing, just somewhere to put the hiring manager’s name, but that could not be further from the truth. Here are a few tips for recent grads, those who have not had to write cover letters for years, or anyone looking for a refresher on this oh-so-important job hunting tool.

Keep it short and pertinent

Keep your cover letter to one page. No matter what. Even if you have the most interesting stories to tell, no one will read past the first page. They are scanning. Only when you grab the hiring manager will they slow down enough to read the actual letter. How to grab them? Start out by telling them you know what they need, and you are that solution. If you know of a new initiative that company is undergoing, state it here. If you think it’s an exciting time to be working for them, tell them so.

Continue in the second paragraph by showing them how your experience fits with what they need. Two short examples from recent experiences. These don’t have to be work experience; they could be volunteer work or school projects or club activities.
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September 23rd, 2011 by Danielle Kogan   Posted in Career Advice, Networking, Recruiting & Hiring, Unemployment

Whether you’re a company looking for the best candidates or a job seeker competing for employment in today’s rugged economy, social media will undoubtedly boost your networking potential.  Get engaged and increase your visibility by growing your networks, participating in online social spaces and staying on top of industry trends.  Businesses and job seekers are vamping up their online presence, and being connected is the best way to gain a competitive advantage.

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August 22nd, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, Job Search

istock_000004555269xsmallYour company is downsizing. Luckily, they’ve told you that your job is safe - if you’re willing to relocate. Or you’ve been out of work and finally got another job offer… on the other side of the country.

With times as tough as they are, you might be considering taking the job. After all, who knows when your next offer will come or if it will even be as good as this one? But before you make any decision, take as much time as you can to consider your options, and what relocating will really mean.

Who pays? With selling and buying a home, moving furniture and other belongings, and possibly even renting a temporary apartments while you house-hunt, relocating can cost anywhere from $25,000 to $75,000 for the average family. Many companies offer relocation packages for new employees that will cover most, if not all, of this, but it’s not guaranteed. You might have to negotiate to have this cost taken into consideration. If your new company still won’t foot the bill, you’ll have to cover everything yourself. The only good news here is that moving expenses can be deducted from your income taxes if you meet certain requirements.
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August 5th, 2011 by Danielle Kogan   Posted in Career Advice, Humor, Job Search, Resume Writing

Job hunting can be extremely nerve-racking, so it’s important that you utilize every available outlet.  If you’re using social networking sites, then you have already taken a step in the right direction.  But sometimes, even if you’re up to speed on the latest internet technology or social networking platforms, you might not necessarily know how to use them in your job search.

These videos are sure to help get your creativity juices flowing.

Google, please hire me



Twitter Job Hustle



Twitter Job Hustle from Wonder Years on Vimeo.
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