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Posts Tagged ‘Resume Tips’

August 22nd, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, Resume Writing

How Long Should Your Resume Be?Generally, the answer is: as short as it can be. Some people belong to the school of thought that anything over a page is simply too long. It’s just one resume among a pile of dozens or hundreds more, so you need to make your case fast before they move on to the next one.

But here’s the thing: you also don’t want to leave off key experience because you’re trying to artificially cram everything onto one page. The key is to highlight the relevant experience, skills, education, and attributes, and for some, this may require two pages. In the case of senior executives with a lot of time in the workforce, your resume may even be longer. However, if you’re a recent college graduate or someone with just a few years of work experience, there’s no reason to have a resume over one page.

Some people incorrectly believe that having a longer resume will make them look more qualified or accomplished, but if you don’t actually have the experience, simply making it longer won’t fool anyone. In fact, it will just take them longer to get to the information that is relevant and may end up in you being passed over for the position.

What You Can Cut

So how do you know if your resume is as short as it can be? Look it over to see what’s extraneous. Each section and each item should be a selling point that gives the potential employer evidence that you are the right candidate. Here are a few common places where you may be able to cut down - or remove things altogether.

References

It’s no longer customary to include your references on your resume, so this is a great section to cut. If your employer is interested in contacting people for recommendations, you can provide them on a separate sheet. Similarly, you don’t need to include a line that says, “References available upon request.” The potential employer will assume this is the case.
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August 9th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Resume Writing

Dynamic LaptopThe next time you update your resume, you may want to consider going online - and not just to look for sample resumes to emulate! Some companies, particularly those in the tech and finance industries, are now requesting digital resumes.

What exactly does that mean? Well, instead of sending them a PDF or Word doc attachment, they want candidates for their positions to send along a link (or links) to their web presence. Even if a position you are applying to doesn’t request  a digital resume, sending one along with your traditional resume can help you stand out from the crowd. That’s never a bad idea, but in this crowded job market it’s practically a necessity. It also has the added advantage of showing that you are web savvy, an important skill in most workplaces today.

So what exactly is a digital resume, and what do employers expect you to include? This is a new format, so there are no set standards like there are for traditional resumes. What one company means by “digital resume” can be very different from another’s idea.

While this may seem overwhelming and confusing at first, it’s actually a wonderful opportunity for you to get creative and highlight your particular strengths.  Here are two of the most popular formats for digital resumes.

LinkedIn

The most basic digital resume is LinkedIn, which is a site that allows you to list your work history, skills, etc., just like you would on a traditional resume. It’s also a social network that allows you to easily connect with people in your field. Many people include the URL for their LinkedIn page on their business cards, providing people with an easy way to discover their work history.
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June 27th, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Job Search, Resume Writing

5 Mistakes on Your Resume that Are Hurting Your Job SearchFinding the job you want has always been a tough, time-consuming task, but these days just getting any job is a difficult prospect. One of the most important tools at your disposal in your hunt for that perfect position is your resume, but if that resume is just so-so, or - worse - riddled with mistakes, you could be making yourself stand out - in a bad way. Want to know some of the worst mistakes you can make on a resume? Read on!

Typos. The person reading your resume has probably gone through several dozen - if not more! - that day, and going through resumes probably isn’t the only job they have to do. Don’t make it any harder on them by turning in a resume with misspellings and grammatical errors. If anything, you’re giving them an easy reason to pass you over.

Poor Use of Subtitles. Lots of people like to use subtitles on their resume to separate it into sections. While this is a good idea and can help to avoid clutter (which we’ll get into shortly), too many people end up using generic terms that say nothing. So next time, instead of “Employment History,” try something like “Previous Teaching Positions” or “Past Administrative Work.” Not only will this clearly show your specific experience for the current position, it will show that you cared enough to tailor your resume for them.

Font selection. It’s great that Word and other programs offer us hundred of choices for the font style we want to use, but only a dozen or so are actually helpful for general use. It may seem boring, but sticking to the old standards is way better than, say, trying to stand out and ending up with something illegible in Curlz MT.
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May 21st, 2012 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in Career Advice, Resume Writing

How to Deal with Unemployment on a ResumeFor a while there at the beginning of this year, it was starting to look like we were entering a new period of job growth that would drastically slash the unemployment rate and herald the rebirth of prosperity.

And then it stopped. Or at least it slowed down dramatically. The most recent jobs report showed that tens of thousands fewer jobs were created than expected, leaving unemployment hovering over 8 percent.

Doesn’t sound like good news, does it? But at least in one way, it can be beneficial for you if you currently find yourself hunting for a job. How? Because being unemployed isn’t as big of a stigma right now as it has been in the past.

Still, that doesn’t mean that you should call attention to gaps in your employment if you don’t have to. For small gaps in your job history, try only listing the years that you were employed at a company on your resume and omitting the months. Unless you’re expressly asked to do otherwise, it’s generally considered okay to do this, and it can be great if you’ve been unemployed for less than a year, because a prospective employer might not ever know there was a gap in your employment.

Unfortunately, recent reports show that unemployed Americans are searching for an average of 28 weeks before they finally find work, and you probably know lots of people who have been looking for far longer. What do you put on your resume if you have this kind of hole?
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January 24th, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice, Resume Writing, Unemployment

Write Your Twin's ResumeOne of the difficulties to overcome in getting a new job is crafting a resume that will float irresistibly towards the top of the applicants pile. This is important because in today’s job market, that pile is larger than ever.

The awkwardness of writing so glowingly about yourself, as well as the difficulty of finding just the right words to convey your competence and skill set to a hiring manager, are two reasons that professional resume-writing services have become so popular: they lift from your shoulders the demanding job of crafting an accurate, compelling resume about yourself.

But another school of thought says that no professional resume-writer can do a better job of telling your story, describing your skills, and presenting the golden needles in the haystack of your employment history better than you can, yourself.

Fortunately, there’s a seldom-used strategy that helps you combine your in-depth self-knowledge with the emotional lightness that comes when you’re not writing or speaking about yourself.

The strategy builds on the existence of freely available, professionally-written descriptions of particular tasks, responsibilities, and accomplishments. All you have to do is pick a winning set of descriptions, then adapt them to fit your own resume.
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