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Posts Tagged ‘Work Discrimination’

February 3rd, 2012 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in Career Advice, In the Workplace

Computer Geek Really MadIn a Utopian world, everyone agrees about everything and there is no conflict. Until we get there, however, learning to understand the causes of conflict - and later, to defuse, defeat, or unwind it - may be among the most important lessons that life can teach.

Of course, conflict has its uses. When people disagree, they drive each other toward new ideas, and they motivate each other to work harder than if there were no conflict at all.

But all in all, conflict is usually more harmful than helpful.

For one thing, in addition to new ideas and higher levels of motivation, conflicts often generate negative feelings, a decline in our reasoning powers, and a temporary set of goals and priorities that may override our more sensible interests in longer-term interests and objectives. For people who are caught up in a conflict, with no clue as to its deepest roots, the situation quite often tends to be maddening, frustrating, and counter-productive.

So it’s usually a good idea not to wallow in conflict for the good it does, but to avoid or eliminate unnecessary conflicts, and properly manage the ones we can’t escape.

Recognize and Understand a Conflict’s Causes

Step Number One in avoiding, eliminating, and managing conflicts is to recognize and understand the cause(s) of the conflict you’re facing.
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November 30th, 2011 by Robert Moskowitz   Posted in In the Workplace

Someone Hates MeIt’s not a pleasant experience, but many of us are operating in workplace situations where we have enemies. Whether it’s a subordinate, a peer, or a superior, feeling enmity beaming at you from someone else is always difficult, often debilitating.

And if the person who doesn’t like you has influence over you and your job, the situation can get very ugly very fast.

Whether or not you feel yourself being disliked or hated right now, chances are pretty good that you’ll experience this emotional pressure sometime during your working life. When you do, there are really only two basic strategies to pursue:

Improve the Situation

No one likes to be hated. So when you feel this negative emotion coming your way, it’s natural to want to improve the situation.

Your first step should always be to figure out who is doing the hating, and why. If the person who hates you is not openly expressing their feelings, use your remaining friendships and connections to zero in on the culprit. Most people don’t like to get involved in these kinds of interpersonal problems, so only your best friends may be willing to name names. Even if they are not, you can usually get hints about the source of the negativity by pretending to know more than you do.
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What to Do If You’ve Been Wrongfully TerminatedAlmost everyone, at some point in his or her life, will be fired or “let go” from a job. Oftentimes, we share in the blame for this, but not always. In fact, experts estimate that a quarter of a million people suffer wrongful termination each year.

That number may seem high, but keep in mind that wrongful termination includes firing for any kind of discrimination, loss of employment due to complaining or whistle blowing, or for refusing to do something illegal for your employer.

In any of these cases, you may be able to sue your former company and - if you win - receive back pay, damages, attorneys’ fees, and even reinstatement at the company. But before you take that big, difficult step, there are some ways to look into whether or not you really have a case without emptying your bank account.

U.S. Department of Labor - Not only can they give you information on every law that regulates employment, you can learn where and how to file a claim.
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Silence Gesture by young woman, What to Do If You’re Being Blackmailed at Work

There are many ways that someone can blackmail you at the workplace. Maybe you made a mistake at work that someone promised to help you cover up. Or it can be a secret of a personal nature that is being used against you. Whatever error you made, you don’t deserve to pay for it over and over again. You don’t have to live in fear. You can take steps to fix the situation.

Talk to someone you trust. Is there a co-worker you are certain you can confide in? Better yet, is there is someone in a position of authority, a manager or a member of HR, you feel you can talk to? If not, consider talking to someone outside of work. Getting advice from a third-party can make a big difference. Sometimes you’re not seeing the situation as clearly as you think you are.

Get some perspective. What are the consequences if this secret comes out? Be honest with yourself. Everyone makes mistakes at work every now and then. It may be better to just come clean about whatever it is than to consider the blackmailers requests.

Don’t make things worse. It can be tempting to want to take action against the person who is blackmailing you. This is not a good idea. In the end, it can harm you just as much, if not more, than the other person. Stay calm. Don’t make any rash decisions.
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August 16th, 2011 by Juliana Weiss-Roessler   Posted in In the Workplace

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This is one of those situations where there’s no easy answer. You don’t want to give in because you’re genuinely not interested, but you also fear saying no and risking your boss retaliating. However, it’s definitely not something that you can ignore, and waiting only makes the situation worse. Here are a few suggestions on things you might try based on your comfort level and your relationship with your boss.

I’m in a relationship. One of the simplest methods to get a would-be suitor of any kind to back down, saying that you’re already seeing someone is a nice way to reject your boss’s advances without hurting their self-esteem and making them possibly want to get back at you.

I don’t get involved with coworkers. A version of the first technique, telling your boss it’s a flat-out rule for you that you don’t date coworkers is another way of putting the onus on you and preserving their pride. If you’re going to use this one, though, you’d better be sure you actually don’t date a coworker in the future.
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