WEB 2.0 Social Software Tools: Different Ways to Share

Resume Writing
Resume Writing
Career Choice
Career Choice
Job Search
Job Search
Interviewing
Interviewing
Employee Rights
Employee Rights
Salary & Benefits
Salary & Benefits
Unemployment
Unemployment
Recruiting & Hiring
Recruiting & Hiring
HR Management
HR Management
Job Networking
Job Networking
RSS Feed
RSS Feed









By Sergey Novoselov
September 13, 2009 in Job Networking

Resumark.com: Post Your Resume and Get Paid!


Share Share

In the previous article we talked about the benefits of social networking and the social software tools that can help you find a job, get your work done, or just have fun communicating to other people. Now we’ll see what can be shared and what tools are available.

Social networking can benefit different groups of people: those who create content, participate in discussions, or just read or reuse information.

What can be shared:
Links, Contacts, Tasks (i.e. delegation), Files (presentations, documents, etc), Your goals, Your thoughts.

Filesharing: placing files, videos, presentations, etc for others to access. (e.g. YouTube, BitTorrent, Flickr)

Wikis: a webpage edited by a group with version tracking (e.g. Wikipedia, WikiTravel, WikiCentral)

Social Bookmarking: Public link tagged for sorting (e.g. del.icio.us, digg, stumbleupon).

Social bookmarking helps to find it easily later, show people that you are knowledgeable about a topic or industry, make people aware of an interesting webpage, improve a link’s visibility in search results.

Forums: Start a new conversation, or contribute to an existing one, within a defined taxonomy (e.g. Yahoo Groups)

Blogs: somebody’s accounts of activities or thoughts, arranged with the most recent, first. (e.g. WordPress, LiveJournal, BlogCentral).

Let’s say you’re an expert in Resume Writing. You can create your own blog or open a forum discussion to share your expertise on how to write a resume, provide resume samples, etc. You will make yourself visible to others and, once you earn reputation, they’ll start contacting you and ultimately may hire you if they need your expertise.

Micro-Blogs: short messages, associated with a commonly followed person or topic (folksonomy) (e.g. Twitter, Yammer)

About 90% of microbloggers are only listening. So it’s a good opportunity to communicate. Convincing others to ReTweet (rebroadcast) your message to their networks is critical to a viral campaign.

Micro-blogging can also be used in an office environment. It is particularly useful for a mobile workforce and facilitates casual status reporting, peripheral awareness of teammate’s activities. It can be utilized for conference backchannel to allow for link sharing, discussion, background, and live Q&A

Sharing will become how you do work. In a document driven business sharing and reusing materials is critical to productivity. Redundant working is going on all around. Surely someone somewhere has already created the document that you need. If the content is shared and tagged, it’s easy to find it. Somebody can reuse materials without ever having to send an email to the people who shared the content and they can see it all online as their reputation grows.
 


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