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<pre>Array ( [var] => cut_url ) </pre> Resume for Andrei S. for Other in Maastricht, Netherlands. Search More Resumes for Other on Resumark.com #AOFVURW6N
 

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Resume for Andrei S. for Other in Maastricht, Netherlands




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Country: Netherlands City: Maastricht
State: Limburg ZIP: 6226NB



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Journal of Social Intervention: Theory and Practice ­ ­ Volume , Issue , pp. ­ URN:NBN:NL:UI: ISSN: URL: Publisher: Igitur publishing Services in cooperation with Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Society and Law Copyright: this work has been published under a Creative Commons AttributionNoncommercialNo Derivative Works . Netherlands License Godelieve van Hees is social work researcher and lecturer at CESRT Research Centre on Social Integration, Faculty of Social Studies, Zuyd University of Applied Sciences, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Correspondence to G.C.C. van Hees, CESRT/Zuyd University, Brusselseweg HB Maastricht, P.O. box , AP, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Email: . Received: November Accepted: February Review Category: Research STudenT SuPerVISIon aS e d u c aT I o n a l m e T H o d I n f a c u lT I e S o f S o c I a l w o r k . a STudY In SeVen euroPean G o d e l I e V e Va n HeeS counTrIeS ABSTRACT Student supervision as an educational method in faculties of social work. a study in seven european countries Supervision Meets Education Van Hees & GeilerPiltz, is the title of a comparative study on the use of supervision in training social workers as part of the Bachelor degree programmes at seven European universities and universities of applied sciences. It is the first research project to be carried out by the Supervision in Social Work Education in Europe SSWEE network. Journal of Social Intervention: Theory and Practice ­ ­ Volume , Issue S Tude nT SuPerVISIon aS educaTIonal meTHod In faculTIeS of SocIal work Supervision is seen as an educational method and to indicate this specific form of supervision, the term "student supervision" has been used. The results of the study are based on seven case studies and a comparative analysis to answer the question: how is supervision integrated into the curriculum and why is it done in this way? The second part of the study concerns a comparative analysis of the case studies. This article details the main results of the differences and similarities not only regarding the way that "supervision" is understood in various settings but also the variety of organizational approaches to supervision within the study programmes themselves. In conclusion, we can say that this description of "the current state of play" provides common ground from which one go on to develop student supervision methodology in the context of European Higher Education and the challenges of a changing profession. Keywords Supervision, student supervision, social work education, Bachelor in Social Work, comparative case study research S A M E N VAT T I N G opleidingssupervisie als didactische methode in opleidingen Sociaal werk. een zoektocht in zeven europese landen Dit artikel doet verslag van een vergelijkende studie naar de praktijk van supervisie in de Bachelor Social Work aan zeven verschillende Europese universiteiten en hogescholen, genaamd Supervision Meets Education Van Hees & GeilerPiltz, . Het betreft een onderzoeksproject van het "Network Supervision in Social Work Education in Europe SSWEE". Supervisie wordt hier besproken als een didactische methode waarvoor in Nederland de term opleidingssupervisie wordt gebruikt en in de context van deze internationale studie de term student supervision. Het onderzoek bestaat uit zeven casestudies en een vergelijkende analyse om een antwoord te geven op de vraag hoe supervisie als leermethode ingebed is in het curriculum en waarom dat zo gedaan is. In dit artikel worden de resultaten van de studie besproken met betrekking tot verschillende opvattingen over supervisie en supervisiemodellen en komen overeenkomsten en verschillen in de uitvoering van de supervisiemethode aan bod. Een van de belangrijkste uitkomsten van het onderzoek is de algemene opvatting dat supervisie thuishoort bij de begeleiding van het leren in de praktijk. Journal of Social Intervention: Theory and Practice ­ ­ Volume , Issue GodelIeVe Van HeeS De resultaten geven inzicht in de huidige supervisiepraktijken aan deze Europese social work opleidingen en leiden tot een basis voor verder onderzoek naar opleidingssupervisie in het perspectief van vernieuwend Europees hoger sociaal agogisch onderwijs. Tr e f w o o r d e n Supervisie, opleidingssupervisie, social work opleidingen, bachelor social work, vergelijkend case studie onderzoek ACKNOWLEDGMENT This article is based on the research project "Supervision meets education; Supervision in the Bachelor in Social Work in Europe" by the SSWEE network. I thank all my fellow researchers on this project for allowing me to use their research work for this article. In particular, my lasting gratitude goes to Brigitte GeilerPiltz and Jose Fernandez i Barrera: their inspiring and professional contributions were of great assistance. INTRODUCTION Institutions of higher education use supervision as a means of training future social workers. It provides a way to guide the students through their learning period in practical training. This article describes a study that focused on supervision in social work education ­ more specifically, Bachelor degree programmes in social work ­ as it is provided in seven faculties of social work across Europe. The idea for this study originated through the creation of an international network of experts in the field of supervision, all of which work at European faculties of social work. The exchange of experiences relating to methods of supervision and the need for an expansion of our current knowledge base led to the establishment of this network, the most important goal of which is to research supervision in educational practice. From the very first meeting it was clear that there was a significant lack of clarity concerning the terminology, frame of reference, underlying theory and the supervision models applied. The first priority became achieving clarity in these areas. The first research project was therefore an explorative study of supervision in the Bachelor programmes of social work in Europe, which examined questions related to concepts, supervision models, and the organization, as well as the experiences of the stakeholders: students and their supervisors. Seven faculties of social work investigated their education programme, their supervision policies and experiences in case studies. Journal of Social Intervention: Theory and Practice ­ ­ Volume , Issue S Tude nT SuPerVISIon aS educaTIonal meTHod In faculTIeS of SocIal work The results of these case studies were compared to identify the similarities and differences, and they provided a lively perspective on supervision practice as it currently exists in these study programmes in social work. The comparative analysis, as well as the entire case studies are published in the book Supervision meets education Van Hees & GeilerPiltz, . Since it refers exclusively to supervision in the academic setting and to distinguish from the educational function in practitioner supervision Kadushin & Harkness, , the term student supervision was accepted by the researchers in this project Van Hees, a. Although student supervision is a wellknown concept in the AngloAmerican tradition Ford & Jones, ; Hawkins & Shohet, , that was not the case in all the supervision cultures researched. The goal of this article is to inform those responsible for study programmes, as well as supervisors and trainers of supervisors, about current supervision practice as an important feature of the curriculum of Bachelor programmes in social work in Europe. It also aims to serve as a starting point for further research, development and dissemination of the supervision method. The article is structured as follows: first the research question is described, then the research method is discussed and thirdly the results are presented. Finally, the conclusion also includes new perspectives for discussion. METhODOLOGy Research question The first expert meeting to be held with European supervisors involved in social work study programmes Van Hees, led to the creation of the SSWEE network. That first meeting provided the starting points that were the basis for an international research project to investigate the nature of supervision practice in European study programmes for Social Work in Europe Van Hees, a. The main conclusion was that research into student supervision in the Bachelor programmes in social work in Europe was needed in order to clarify the various ways in which supervision is used as an educational method, to contribute to supervision research in general and to make the practice of supervision more accessible for student exchange. Another point of agreement was the need to place the research into student supervision within the context of the Bologna process in order to innovate and harmonize the Higher Education area in Europe Tuning Sectoral Framework for Social Sciences, . The members of the network agreed on case study research as an appropriate method for conducting comparative research. These results led to the network&;s first research project with the main research question: Journal of Social Intervention: Theory and Practice ­ ­ Volume , Issue GodelIeVe Van HeeS How is supervision embedded in the curriculum of the Bachelor in social work and why is it done in this way? After exploring the primary question, secondary questions were developed concerning three specific aspects. The first was the general context of social work and social work study programmes in each country and at each faculty, the second aspect was the individual vision of supervision as found in each country and educational institute, and third came the supervision practices specific to each institute. The results were collected in a comparative analysis based on the questions examining similarities, differences and noteworthy findings. The research method: Comparative crossnational case study research Seven countries and universities are represented in this research project, creating a good balance across Europe, although these participants were assembled more by chance than design. The project includes the "new" countries of Croatia HR and Slovenia SI, where social work is taught at universities. The same is true for the northernmost and southernmost countries in the study: Sweden SE and Spain ES. Also represented are Belgium BE, the Netherlands NL and Germany DE, where social work is taught at the level of universities of applied sciences. However, glaringly absent from the list are representatives of the westernmost part of Europe, the United Kingdom and Ireland. There is a good reason for this: in these countries supervision is not offered during social work degree programmes and is thus not part of the curriculum. In those countries, supervision is the responsibility of the agency with which newly qualified social workers take up employment. We are aware that this project thus omits one special form of supervision: administrative supervision Kadushin & Harkness, . However, an additional advisory format would have been too much for the joint research process involved here. Further research is required into the use of this form of guidance in the field. A case study method was used in this study Swanborn, ; Baarda, De Goede & Theunissen, . Case studies seek ways to investigate questions which begin with how and why Yin, . Since the research question concerns student supervision in the Bachelor degree study programmes in Europe, a multiple case study approach was an easy choice. This means that there would be two parts to this project: firstly the case study research for each faculty and secondly the comparison of the results of the seven cases. Each case study was carried out according to the guidelines developed for this research for the purposes of making comparisons Van Hees, b. Journal of Social Intervention: Theory and Practice ­ ­ Volume , Issue S Tude nT SuPerVISIon aS educaTIonal meTHod In faculTIeS of SocIal work The partners in the project were researchers from the respective faculties and they were responsible for the research plan and the research method used for each faculty case study. They justified their method of working by describing the methods and sources used to collect data and analyse the findings, and how they composed the case report. The researchers were all experienced in supervision, had all performed supervision and most of them had conducted research on this subject. All of them had also been involved in the design and development of the social work curriculum at their faculty or in the development of Master&;s programmes and international supervision exchange projects. A great variety of sources were used in this qualitative case study research. In addition to international supervision literature and national supervision sources, researchers were able to use relevant study programme documents describing educational visions and methods, and educational material, such as student modules and project books. In addition, all researchers held interviews with stakeholders such as students, supervisors, field instructors and educational developers. Researchers gathered and analysed their data according to their own chosen research method. The data from the separate case studies can be consulted via the website of the SSWEE network . Method used in the comparison of crossnational case studies A comparative study of the results of these separate case studies was conducted following Swanborn method . The analysis of the findings of the separate case studies was performed as follows. The first step consisted of a general interpretation of the case studies, taking a wider perspective on it and assessing the insight it provided. The second step involved screening the research methods used in each case followed by a further screening to identify any hidden categories and subcategories, i.e. any that were not explicitly required in the general guidelines. The categories were arranged in a matrix with anchor words. Step was a reliability check, which was carried out according to the analysis of the research method of each case and comparing methods between cases, as well as a strengthweakness analysis. Finally, all categories and subcategories were analysed and arranged in a matrix for each case. The material was then ready to be compared so that common qualities, differences and ambiguities in the various cases could be identified step . The findings step of the comparative analysis were presented making extensive use of quotations. Using quotations was an effective way of making the text more vivid and providing apt illustrations of the abstract summaries and considerations which were part of the comparative text. In this study, the quotations were especially interesting since they allowed the parties Journal of Social Intervention: Theory and Practice ­ ­ Volume , Issue GodelIeVe Van HeeS concerned to express their points of view. In this case, the supervisors and/or students described their experiences in different terms to those used by the programme designers and the educational chiefs. The last step of the comparative study step was to summarize the results, which led to the conclusions and some points of discussion. In Supervision meets Education Van Hees & GeilerPiltz, , the entire project is described and all the case studies were included. R E S U LT S : S T U D E N T S U P E R V I S I O N I N T h E B A C h E L O R S O F S O C I A L WORK IN EUROPE The case studies yielded a great deal of data on educating future social workers as well as on supervision as a tool for guiding learning processes. Moreover, they also provide an interesting perspective on the development of supervision in each country and the underlying concepts that have led to the development of a supervision model that fits for the education programme of that country. Most social work education programmes in Europe offer student supervision to support the students and guide their learning processes during their field education. However, student supervision is subject to different interpretations. The differences mainly relate to the design, the organization and the way that supervision is embedded in the curriculum, but, significantly, there is consensus between all schools on the usefulness of supervision for students and on what the schools wish to achieve by using it. So where do these differences come from? A number of issues seem to play a role. The education institutions base their opinions and visions of supervision on international supervision literature from the field of social professions, but for the design of their supervision policy they rely primarily on their country&;s national tradition of education and supervision. Furthermore, the history of social work in a particular country and the history of the education programme itself, as well as various political influences and the presence or lack of supervision expertise, all add their own flavour to the development of supervision models in the programmes. These ­ often lively ­ descriptions gave us answers to the "why" aspect of the research question. Vision of supervision First of all, student supervision is seen as an educational method that is geared towards allowing the students to develop into competent, newly qualified professionals. Student supervision is linked to learning in practice, more specifically to experience in the field, through which students learn to exercise their profession independently, to a greater or lesser extent. All cases emphasize that during the field practice period, the true confrontation takes place with the client, with the Journal of Social Intervention: Theory and Practice ­ ­ Volume , Issue S Tude nT SuPerVISIon aS educaTIonal meTHod In faculTIeS of SocIal work professional domain and with oneself as a future professional. Students have learned social work theory and methods, but now the reality of the profession is presented and this often results in a real "practice shock". Academic training cannot prepare them for the reallife skills required to work in this field, since these can only be learned through practice, as this supervisor from Zagreb, Croatia, relates: In this process, students very often come and tell me: `It is so easy to learn what initial contact is, but how to do it, what are the things that may happen, which processes can start?&; Van Hees & GeilerPiltz, , p. . Objectives pertain to personal and professional development and to developing a learning attitude. The core activity is learning how to reflect on professional experiences in the field placement. All programmes agree that student supervision is not only a technical and rational approach to learning about one&;s future work, but must also involve reflection on personal actions, experiences, feelings and thoughts. For all programmes, this is a key point: the social worker is seen as an instrument in the relationship with the client. It follows, then, that reflection is used to reflect on one&;s own person, focusing on learning to deploy oneself to achieve the professional objectives. Supervision is not only described as a challenging process by the

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